POCKET STEREOSCOPE (Jul, 1933)

This looks like an early Viewmaster.

POCKET STEREOSCOPE SHOWS VIEWS ON FILM

Gone is the old-fashioned parlor stereoscope of a generation ago, but its counterpart, in modern guise, has just made its appearance. The new pocket-sized form of the instrument, illustrated above, is as small as a pair of opera glasses and uses thirty-five-millimeter motion picture film instead of paper photographs. A shift lever causes the pictures to appear.

5 comments
  1. Stannous says: April 9, 20078:57 pm

    you’re absolutely right, I think the Viewmaster even uses 35mm film.

    Check out this 3D viewer site- lots of vintage stuff!
    http://www.3dstereo.com…

  2. Charlie says: April 9, 200710:11 pm

    Very cool site.

  3. jayessell says: April 10, 20078:06 am

    Re #1:

    The viewmaster reel transpanencies are way smaller than 35mm.

    16mm or some proprietary scale.

    Re #2

    I’ll check that out. Thanks.

    *********

    The guys who developed HDTV, should have made 3DTV instead.

    Supposedly at a recent Consumer Electronics Show, LG, the maker of LCD TVs amoung other things, demonstrated a goggelless 3D large screen LCD.

    I suspect to get the left eye/right eye seperation, the viewers would have to be in designated areas in front of the screen.

    (My ascii-fu is weak but something like this…)

    *****L*R***L*R***L*R***L*R*****

    ****(@^@)*******(@^@)**********

    where bands of left eye image and right eye image areas from the screen have to meet the viewers’ appropriate eye.

  4. Andrew L. Ayers says: May 12, 20103:04 pm

    I own one of these (or one really similar). I found it an antique store; it came with one roll of images (but the roll has been stored for so long that I don’t dare to try to unroll it) – its about the same vintage, from what I remember. I consider it a part of my “virtual reality” collection…

  5. Toronto says: May 12, 20108:56 pm

    Post Cereal gave away somewhat similar 3d viewers in the early ’60s. If I recall, you got the viewer for 3 box tops, and a slide or two in every box. Probably half-frame 35mm film.

    I had a whole set of dinosaur slides. Post cereals were mostly crap, but they had the best bonuses and the best cartoons.

    (Actually, Shredded Wheat/Shreddies had the best promotional items – things like checker sets and sets of fighter planes (1:288 or smaller), etc. But what kid ate those?)

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