SIGNS GUARD INVALIDS FROM HONKING CARS (Feb, 1932)

SIGNS GUARD INVALIDS FROM HONKING CARS
When the city surveyor of Birmingham, England, recently sought a way to end the honking of automobiles outside the homes of sick persons, he devised the means shown in the photograph. Signs bearing a warning legend were prepared and placed in readiness by city officials. Now a written or telephoned request brings a messenger who will affix the notice outside the afflicted home, to stay until it is no longer needed. The scheme is a boon to invalids, as public hospitals have hitherto been the only ones favored with “Quiet” signs.

5 comments
  1. fluffy says: May 11, 200811:10 am

    It still amazes me that at one time, “invalid” was an acceptable term for someone who was bedridden.

  2. Rick Auricchio says: May 11, 200811:15 am

    So while one driver is distracted looking for “don’t honk” signs, the other driver almost hits him and has to honk.

  3. Slim says: May 11, 200811:37 am

    For some reason these remind me of the “Baby on board” placards. I wonder if they were just as effective.

  4. David Moisan says: May 11, 20083:03 pm

    You don’t see “quiet” signs outside hospitals anymore, except in Warner Brothers cartoons.

  5. nlpnt says: May 11, 20083:33 pm

    For being in England, those shield-shaped road signs have a very American look to them- sort of like the old-style U.S. Highway signs (as seen in “The Grapes of Wrath”.

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