SPORTS RADIO is Combination Cane and Seat (Mar, 1940)

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SPORTS RADIO is Combination Cane and Seat

By FRANK TOBIN

CONSISTING of a compact yet powerful battery receiver mounted on a conventional cane-seat which can be purchased for a dollar or two, the radio illustrated forms a handy set for hikers, sports spectators, and campers. The circuit, designed around three of the new American-made midget tubes, consists of a pentode regenerative detector, resistance coupled to a pentode amplifier which in turn is resistance coupled to a second audio-amplifier stage. Regeneration is controlled by a 25,000-ohm potentiometer. Since the commercial type of antenna coil shown in the diagram has no tickler winding it will be necessary to provide one by winding approximately thirty-five turns of No. 38 double-silk-covered wire around the lower end of the long, flat grid coil.

With the maximum of 45 volts of “B” voltage used, 1/2 watt, or even 1/4 watt, resistors can be used, while a maximum rating of 200 volts is sufficient for the .01 mfd. by-pass and coupling condensers. These condensers can be of the paper or tubular type. All other condensers, however, should be of the mica variety.

The receiver and its battery supply are housed in two cabinets each 1-5/8″ by 4-1/4″ by 5-1/2″ and mounted on the handles of the cane. Sliding panels serve as covers and make it an easy matter to change batteries or make repairs. The cabinets are fastened to the aluminum handles by means of long bolts and metal bushings.

Two 1-1/2-volt cells connected in parallel serve as the “A” battery supply, and may be obtained as a single unit or by breaking open a four-cell “A” battery. The midget 45-volt “B” battery fits snugly beside the “A” cells in the battery cabinet.

For an antenna, a steel fence, the metal cane, or a 35′ piece of wire will serve.

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