Sun-Powered Receiver (Apr, 1956)

If they have a battery that powers the radio for eight months why would the solar cells be necessary?

Sun-Powered Receiver
An experimental pocket-sized radio receiver, powered by energy from the sun, weighs only 10 ounces and will work more than eight months in total darkness without recharging. Developed by General Electric, the set uses a miniature storage battery, four transistors, and seven solar cells. During the day, light rays hit the solar cells which convert the sun’s energy to electrical current. This current powers the transistors and, at the same time, charges the storage battery which takes over at night. Artificial light, such as an ordinary 100-watt bulb, may be substituted for sunlight.

4 comments
  1. Alan J. Richer says: November 20, 20078:40 am

    >If they have a battery that powers the radio for eight months why would the solar cells be necessary?

  2. Stannous says: November 20, 200711:16 am

    must be in Alaska or Antarctica

  3. jayessell says: November 20, 200712:31 pm

    Perhaps they meant that once charged, it could remain in darkness for 8 months until needed and still have sufficient power to run the radio.

    (Translated from German?)

  4. Dave says: July 11, 20089:16 am

    One of my first projects was a solar powered crystal radio that used a B2M solar
    cell.

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