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Tag "art"
Silk-Screen Stenciling… A Profitable Hobby (May, 1945)

Silk-Screen Stenciling… A Profitable Hobby

HOW POSTERS, GREETING CARDS, DECORATED MATS, AND ART WORK CAN BE REPRODUCED IN QUANTITY WITH SIMPLE HOMEMADE EQUIPMENT

By J. I. Biegeleisen.

YOU can hardly go through an ordinary day without coming across many articles printed by silk screen. Tablecloths, glasses, trays, book jackets, posters—these are but a few examples of the variety of decorative materials made possible with the silk-screen process.

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Making Artistic Arc-Welded Objects (May, 1932)

These look like something dredged up from the bottom of the ocean.

Making Artistic Arc-Welded Objects

STUDENTS of an electrical arc welding company’s classes have worked out a scheme for making highly ornamental objects which beat all for uniqueness and distinction. In this novel process, which forms a part of their classroom work, they salvage waste metal and convert it into such articles as shown in the accompanying photos.

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Englishman Wins Fame for Quaint Wood Carvings (May, 1929)

What is going on with these images? It looks like some of the sculptures and some of the arms are just drawn in, or at least outlined. It’s kind of disconcerting.

Englishman Wins Fame for Quaint Wood Carvings

Tom Charman of Godshill, England, “made a better mousetrap” than his neighbors and consequently the whole world is beating a path to his door. His quaint wood carvings have attracted so much attention from European artists that an exhibition of his statuettes is soon to be held in London. He lives in an unpretentious hut and secures the materials for his carvings by picking up tree branches and odd pieces of wood from a forest near his home.

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COPS MAKE FACES IN LOS ANGELES (Nov, 1954)

COPS MAKE FACES IN LOS ANGELES

Victims are putting the finger on criminals with the aid of a new machine that builds-a-face.

By Louis Hochman

IT was a dark, lonely night and the attractive young Los Angeles woman walking down the street had no way of knowing that the man who had befriended her and was walking beside her was a dangerous sex criminal. For three blocks they walked and talked—suddenly the man turned on the girl, beat her mercilessly with his fists and shot her through the head.

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COWBOY IS SCULPTOR (May, 1929)

COWBOY IS SCULPTOR

PERHAPS Charlie Beal made mud pies when he was a kid. At any rate, the erstwhile Glacier National park cowboy amuses himself and many tourists with his clay models of objects and people in the park.

The photo below shows him with his latest creation, “A Stage Coach En Route.” Every characteristic of both the coach and animals is modeled in minute detail. The team of six horses straining to get the heavy stage over the crest of a hill is one of his best.

It provides a striking contrast to the huge trains of busses which now travel through the park. “Oldtimers” who have viewed the cowboy’s stage, declare that he has reproduced a famous old coach.

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TABLE-TOP DRAMAS (Aug, 1945)

TABLE-TOP DRAMAS

Table-top photography is more than just a hobby with Mr. E. Heimann, F.R.P.S., F.I.B.P. of London, England; it has become a real science and a profitable one.

He started photographing table-top models for his own amusement years ago and as he became more experienced, found there was a demand for his pictures. Thereupon he left his office job and concentrated upon his new art.

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ATOMIC ART (Nov, 1954)

Dr Wheeler passed away in 1999.  Obituary may be found here (PDF)

ATOMIC ART

By Gene Bylinsky

WHILE trying to “tag” microscopic fungi with the use of radioactive isotopes in 1951 for the Atomic Energy Commission, Dr. Harry Wheeler, Associate Professor of Botany at Louisiana State University, discovered that when the tiny fungi were given radioactive food and placed upon photographic paper they would take pictures of themselves. Working with his wife Naomi and Mrs. Caroline Durieux, under whom his wife was studying print-making methods, they tried using isotopes for prints—with great success.

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King Coal’s Sculptor (Mar, 1950)

King Coal’s Sculptor

By H. W. Kellick

A dirty hunk of coal is the last place where you’d look for beauty. But every day Charles Cunningham of Summit Hill, Pennsylvania, conjures beautiful animals, art objects or busts of famous people out of ugly lumps of anthracite.

To work this black magic, Cunningham goes down into the mine himself to pick out his own pieces of coal. Back in his home shop, he splits a big hunk with hammer and chisel to the size he wants for his new creation. Then he carefully chips and carves this piece into shape. Just how he gets the mirror-like surface that marks his masterpieces, though, is one magic rite he won’t reveal.

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VEGETABLE FASHIONS (Jun, 1946)

VEGETABLE FASHIONS

Margaret Newman, a well-known New York sculptress, has turned her talents to a new and original field. Using a vegetable garden as a source of color and supply, she has ventured into the field of women’s fashions with amusing mannekins made wholly of fruits and vegetables.

With the help of celery, radishes, grapes, lemons, orange peelings, red and green peppers and carrots, she has created numerous vegetable fashion styles, four of which are shown on this page.

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Giant Mt. Rushmore Memorial Completed (Jan, 1942)

Giant Mt. Rushmore Memorial Completed

HUGE faces of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt carved atop 6,200-foot Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills of South Dakota were recently completed, after 14 years of blasting and chiseling by famed Gutzon Borglum. The faces are of a size proportionate to men 465 feet tall. Borglum died last year and the great task was finished by his son.

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