Archive
Tag "baseball"
Bazooka Turns Pitcher (Feb, 1947)

Bazooka Turns Pitcher

Using the tube of a bazooka he carried during the war, Pete Wald, a New York optometrist, devised. the mechanical baseball pitcher shown below. The tube carries the balls to a motor-driven throwing arm.

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Eavesdropping Mike Listens In on Umpire’s Scraps at Ball Park (Dec, 1940)

Eavesdropping Mike Listens In on Umpire’s Scraps at Ball Park
So THAT baseball fans may eavesdrop on arguments between the umpire and players next spring, a “disappearing microphone” has been included in a new public-address system at a Wichita, Kans., stadium. Pressing a foot lever allows the microphone to pop from its underground box near the home plate. Through loudspeakers, the spectators then enjoy the novelty of hearing what is going on. In case a dispute becomes too heated for sensitive ears, the mike hastily retreats. As at left, it may also be used for announcements.

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Camouflaged Bat Bewilders the Pitcher, But Gets Banned (Jul, 1932)

Camouflaged Bat Bewilders the Pitcher, But Gets Banned

THERE’S an old saying about necessity, being the mother of invention. “Goose” Goslin, outfielder for the St. Louis Browns, was having a hard time hitting that old “apple” during the spring training so he adopted a black and white striped bat, shown at the right, and proceeded to pound his way out of the slump.

This was the first time in baseball history that a camouflaged bat was used. It was designed by Willis Johnson, club secretary, who planned to equip other players with bats decorated with cross-rings, blocks and triangles until the “higher ups” declared the use of the bat illegal.

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Old And New Communication Methods Combined (Oct, 1939) (Oct, 1939)

Old And New Communication Methods Combined

Old and new methods of communication were combined recently when a Cincinnati radio station used carrier pigeons to speed pictures of a baseball game between Cincinnati Rends and Pittsburgh Pirates to its studio for immediate transmission.

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