Archive
Tag "cosmetics"
Skin-Tone Analyzer Selects Right Color for Face Cosmetics (Oct, 1939)

Skin-Tone Analyzer Selects Right Color for Face Cosmetics

To determine the exact cosmetic color that will best blend with individual skin tones, a novel analyzing apparatus has just been introduced for beauty-shop use. A complicated system of lenses, prisms, and a polarizing screen is used to throw a tiny rainbow of light onto the skin of a customer. Analysis of the basic color tone of the skin is then made by noting which shade of the spectrum is most absorbed and which is most reflected.

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Bracelet Holds Complete Kit for Make-Up (Dec, 1938)

Bracelet Holds Complete Kit for Make-Up

Useful as well as decorative, a new “cosmetic bracelet” provides makeup in handy form, especially for social occasions when it would be a nuisance to carry a handbag. Turning an outer metal band on the bracelet uncovers any of seven compartments holding lip rouge, face rouge, and face powder, together with puffs for applying them and mirrors to aid in a quick “touch-up.”

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‘Rubber’ Make-Up Gives Actor Many Faces (Mar, 1938)

Lucien Littlefield (1895-1960) had  quite the career.  I knew of him from his two totally different performances with Laurel & Hardy.

‘Rubber’ Make-Up Gives Actor Many Faces

NEW FEATURES MOLDED TO SUIT ANY CHARACTER.

A NEW era in the development of make-up for stage and screen is forecast by the introduction of a rubber plastic material that has been adopted for make-up use by Lucien Littlefield, screen star who specializes in character roles. Employed in the manufacture of gasoline-pump hose, printing rollers, and protective coverings for electric cable, the rubber plastic, developed by Du Pont chemists, makes it unnecessary to resort to painful skin-stretching, padding, and other uncomfortable expedients of the type used by the late Lon Chaney when he made himself up for character parts.

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NEW in SCIENCE (May, 1950)

NEW in SCIENCE

Static Garter protects you from static electricity explosions in textile mills, and chemical and munition plants. The device consists of a garter connected by chain to a contact pin clipped to the sole. Thus static charges are grounded to a conductive floor. Walter G. Legge, N. Y.

Window Salesman makes customers out of window shoppers. It’s a tape recording device which takes orders from outside by means of a mike inserted in the window. Practical jokers will find it expensive because it will cost them a quarter a shot. Gimbels, Philadelphia.

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The “Moroccan Princess” Who Had the Laugh on London (Nov, 1959)

She doesn’t seem to have made a huge impression, at least that I can find online. There is a reference in a publication called Theater Arts and one called Hispano Americano, but Google isn’t allowed to actually show the full content.

The “Moroccan Princess” Who Had the Laugh on London

A masquerading model, a pot of murky makeup and London got a royal ribbing.

By HANS HOBEL

“–UNDER ANY LIGHT. She looked divine under any light—that dark, coppery skin she has . . .” The gentleman sighed reminiscently and toyed with the handle of his umbrella.

“Yes . . .” His companion nodded. “She was beautifully built, y’know. Legs—”

“Did you—” The first gentleman expressed shock.

“Hardly. Couldn’t imagine trying. It’s—well, it’s seldom you meet someone so—how shall I say—regal in the true sense of the word.”

“At any rate, she’s no longer with us, the princess. Pity,” Umbrella said. Both speculated silently for a moment where the princess could have gone.

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Comb on Tube Cap Applies Mascara (Jul, 1939)

Comb on Tube Cap Applies Mascara

FOR applying mascara to eyelashes, an ingenious inventor has combined a miniature comb with the cap of the container. Saturated with cosmetic when withdrawn, the novel applicator is used as shown and then replaced, avoiding waste.

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MAKEUP SECRETS of Movie HORROR Pictures (Feb, 1933)

MAKEUP SECRETS of Movie HORROR Pictures

When you shudder at the sight of frightful characters in horror movies, it is usually the makeup man who is responsible for your thrills. Read here how he creates actors that terrify you.

by JAMES BOWLES

FROM the depths of an ancient casket a bony and shriveled hand stretched back across history thirty-seven centuries to snatch a scroll from a terror-stricken actress.

Deep, gray lines of age streaked the hand. Dust fell from ancient fingers. Yet it moved, actually grasped the parchment, and disappeared from the screen.

Outside the camera angle sat Boris Karloff. It was his hand whose antiquity the camera revealed, a hand “mummified” earlier in the morning by Jack Pierce, movie make-up expert, who recently produced a living mummy in the person of Karloff, complete in 1500 feet of rotted cloth bandages, wrinkled skin, closed eyes and the yellow hair of a person dead many centuries.

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STAG – A Man’s Cream For a Man’s Face (Mar, 1922)

MANHOOD- Make Your Face Show it
Every real man wants the clear, rugged, ruddy face of a real he-man; the healthy, clean skin and alert expression that comes from a vigorous life in the open air. All men want it— all women admire it. You can have it.

STAG – A Man’s Cream For a Man’s Face

—is a true facial invigorator and tonic prepared for men. Two minutes’ use brings the red blood tingling to the surface, removes that oily, sallow appearance and leaves the skin clean, clear, firm and with healthy color. It invigorates and hardens the facial muscles and promotes an alert, forceful expression. A sixty-day treatment—with money-back guarantee—will be sent to you for a dollar bill.

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Guinea Pigs Test New Beauty Aids (Jun, 1939)

Guinea Pigs Test New Beauty Aids

GUINEA PIGS are partly responsible for the beauty of many of the glamorous faces that flash across the screen of your neighborhood movie theater. Tests with these patient little rodents have even saved the film careers of actors and actresses whose skin reacted unfavorably to ordinary studio make-up. Now applied to the manufacture of cosmetics for the general public, similar tests are guarding the beauty and health of millions.

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Make-Up For Television (Sep, 1939)

Make-Up For Television

Elaine Shepard, Hollywood film actress, could pass for an Indian in war paint when she wears the new standard television make-up. White high-lighting around the nostrils, eyes and hollows of the throat is necessary for good reproduction. Lips, eyebrows and eyelashes are blue-black.

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