Archive
Tag "fire"
Reeling to Safety (Mar, 1947)

Reeling to Safety. Fire threaten? Strap on the belt, climb out the hotel window, and—as Detroit inventor Irving Bassett shows—a steel tape reels out automatically to drop you safely to the ground.

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Murdered On The Operating Table! (Oct, 1937)

Apparently this story was so sensational that the editors had to abandon their headline capitalization style guide. “Screw it, this story is too big, I’m going all in. If I don’t, how will our readers know that it happened On The operating table?”

Surprisingly, operating room fires still happen quite often. The FDA has an initiative to help reduce the number of occurrences.

Murdered On The Operating Table!

AN anesthetized patient on an operating table — the surgeon approaches with a white – hot instrument—the patient explodes and two operating room attendants are injured!—The clipping from the New York Times tells the story.

Medical history will show that this is not the first time such an accident occurred. That same history should also record that there is no reason why such accidents should happen.

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PORTABLE LIFT TO SAVE FIRE-TRAPPED VICTIMS (Dec, 1930)

PORTABLE LIFT TO SAVE FIRE-TRAPPED VICTIMS

Ladders as means of escape from a burning building may be replaced by a portable elevator invented by M.E. Hayman, a member of the Portland, Ore., fire department. In case of a fire, the elevator is rushed to the scene and by hand or motor power it is raised in front of the desired window.

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COLLECTING THE NATION’S FIRE TAX (Feb, 1909)

COLLECTING THE NATION’S FIRE TAX

By HENRY S. CHASE

THIS is a story of incendiarism—a story of the lengths to which, under certain circumstances, some respected business men will go, and how and why they pass into the criminal class. This is a story showing, too, how men organize syndicates to carry on the exciting, pleasurable and profitable business of arson.

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Escape Chute (Apr, 1948)

Escape Chute can evacuate the entire 136-bed Georgia Baptist Hospital, Atlanta, in only a few minutes. In case of fire, patients can be picked up, mattress and all, and slid to safety down the spiral chute.

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Fighting Oil Fires with Mud and Steam (May, 1929)

Fighting Oil Fires with Mud and Steam

By RAY ALLAN

Tunneling 50 feet beneath the surface of the earth to tap the casing of a burning oil well, California firemen subdued the fierce flames by injecting a mixture of mud and live steam into the heart of the flaring well.

WHEN nature goes on a rampage and expresses her feelings in the form of a gas or oil blowout in the oil fields, the fire which frequently accompanies the upheaval would tax the resources of a metropolitan fire department.

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ENOUGH WOOD FOR A HOUSE IN BONFIRE (Sep, 1915)

That is rather a lot of wood, all to remove “hoodoo” from their football team.

Apparently it didn’t work, Charlie.  Looking in Stanford’s archives, in 1915 they weren’t national or conference champions and they didn’t go to the Rose Bowl until 1925. They lost to Notre Dame 27-10.

ENOUGH WOOD FOR A HOUSE IN BONFIRE

EACH year, at Stanford University, there is built an enormous bonfire pile, which is lit on the night of the big football rally and around which the students pledge their support to their team, two days before the big game with the University of California.

A good idea of the size of the pile can be obtained by comparing it to the men standing by it. From the top of the tower to the ground is over fifty feet, while the huge pyre measures over thirty feet at the base. The tower of the pile is an imitation of the Sather Campanile, one of the new buildings of the University of California.

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ON THE HOT SEAT (Nov, 1956)

That really depends on what part of the sun they are talking about

ON THE HOT SEAT
SEATED on a fiery wicker chair in the 1200°F heat in the furnace of Seaporcel Metals, Inc. plant at Long Island City, N. Y., ceramic engineer

D. J. Bennett wears new aluminum-coated fireproof suit. Makers claim suit will withstand temperatures one-eighth as hot as the sun.

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Cover-Up for Fire (Jul, 1962)

Cover-Up for Fire

Enclosed in a convenient stand-up case attached to the wall, a fireproof blanket can be yanked out and wrapped around an industrial worker whose clothes are in flames.

A loop of rope extends outside the case. The person on fire can pull this, whirl to the left and wrap himself tightly in the blanket. Blanket and case ($33) made by Mine Safety Appliances Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.

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How Firebugs Burn Millions (Dec, 1930)

How Firebugs Burn Millions

Criminal Torch Starts One Fourth of All Fires—This Costs You Money

By MICHEL MOK

STORES in a big town in western New York had closed for the day when a small delivery truck drew up at the curb of one of the main shopping streets. A few minutes later two men, one of whom carried a bundle, stopped in front of a furniture store just across the street, looked about as if to make sure they were unobserved, and went inside. After a little while, one of them came out, carefully locked the door, and walked away.

The instant he was out of sight, the driver of the truck leaped from his cab and dashed to the back of the store. Soon he returned, dragging by the arm the man who had carried the bundle—a well-dressed, middle-aged individual. The package now was held by the driver, a powerful fellow who, with his free hand, forced the other into the truck.

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