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Tag "gardening"
Lawn Mower Has Small Removable Blades Permitting Easy Sharpening (May, 1932)

Lawn Mower Has Small Removable Blades Permitting Easy Sharpening

THE old style cutting blade of the lawn mower has gone by the board and manufacturers have come out with a new type of clipper which promises to level off the grass with a greater degree of ease.

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See the GAY BLADE (Apr, 1958)

Not to be confused with The Washington Blade.

See the GAY BLADE

America’s Newest Power Mower

DIFFERENT to look at, easier to handle bicycle-type wheels make the Gay Blade easy to operate.

It’s the power mower you’ll be proud of for its superior “good looks” … its smoother operation … its consistently outstanding performance! See it … try it … you’ll want to own the wonderful new Gay Blade. Available in push-style or self-propelled models.

See the Gay Blade complete line of power mowers today or write direct for nearest dealer.

A QUALITY PRODUCT OF YAZOO MANUFACTURING CO. * JACKSON, MISS.

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STYLES in TURNSTILES (Aug, 1945)

Why?

STYLES in TURNSTILES

A quaint turnstile for a country garden fence.

BY ROBERTA L. FAIRALL

FOR landscaping beauty add a turnstile along that garden path, patio entrance, or in the fence which separates the front from the back yard. They are different and handy.

For the cottage by the sea or lakeshore, the turnstile with a nautical design is just the thing. A 4″x4″ post approximately 5′ long is set 2′ into the ground in cement; then two 2″x4″ boards, each as long as you wish your gate to be wide, are fastened together at the middle with a cross-lap joint.

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Sprayer Travels Over Lawn (Dec, 1937)

Sprayer Travels Over Lawn

A LOCOMOTIVE lawn sprayer invented by William H. Soper, of Denver, Colo., pulls itself along by winding in a light wire cable which may be staked out for one hundred feet from the machine. While slowly traveling, the machine throws any type of spray through an arc of 180 degrees.

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These Flower BEDS ARE Novel (May, 1931)

These Flower BEDS ARE Novel

YOU would hunt far and perhaps in vain, to find more novel flower beds than W. F. Wilke, of Omaha, has made for the vacant corner lot beside his home. At the first glance, the area seems to be actually cluttered up with odd and elaborate designs—which on second glance appear to be flower beds. Mr. Wilke naturally disliked to estimate the time he has spent on them. One knows the hours have been many. Yet the completed task is one of permanence and distinction.

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