Archive
Tag "gas masks"
Miscellaneous Cool Stuff (Jul, 1930)

I can’t decide which picture I like better, the two guys fighting with sand blasters or the gas masks.

Miscellaneous Cool Stuff
SHOT FIRED AGAINST STEEL TO CLEAN IT

A scene suggesting a fantastic stage setting is enacted daily in a remote room of the General Electric Company’s plant at Schenectady, N.Y. There, under the glare of powerful lights, gnomelike workmen scour large steel castings to prepare them for a coat of paint. Hoses in their hands discharge a continuous, clattering volley of fine steel shot upon the part being cleaned. In this dusty atmosphere, the men must wear headgear like divers’ helmets, with fresh washed air supplied to them continuously through tubes from outside the room.

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Hoodlike Gas Mask Protects Babies (Aug, 1939)

Hoodlike Gas Mask Protects Babies

Three years of research have solved the grim problem of fitting babies with gas masks, according to the British designer of the model illustrated in use below. Rubberized gasproof fabric completely incloses an infant from the waist up in a capacious hood with a large cellulose acetate window. A hand bellows operated by the parent supplies pure filtered air for the baby to breathe.

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Zipper Gas Mask Made for Babies (May, 1934)

Zipper Gas Mask Made for Babies
A SPECIAL handbag for carrying babies furnishes protection in case of a wartime gas attack. An oxygen tank begins to function as soon as the zipper cover is closed, supplying air to the baby.

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INDUSTRY’S MASKED MEN (Jul, 1942)

INDUSTRY’S MASKED MEN
HELMETS, gas masks, eye shields, respirators, rubber gloves, tough leather bibs. These are indispensable guardians of the eyes, lungs, and hides of many of America’s industrial war workers today. Without them, injuries would sabotage and cripple production of planes and arms for the United Nations’ fighting forces. Commonest of the devices are pictured here.

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FUTURE GI (May, 1959)

FUTURE GI. Keyhole peek at what the atomic war’s fighting men may wear. New Army developments shown at Fort Ord, Cal., are this transistor-radio helmet, heat-resistant mask, nylon armored vest and automatic aluminum-alloy rifle that fires at a rate of 700 rounds a minute.

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Gas! (Apr, 1946)

Gas!

America was ready to give and take if the Axis had turned loose with the most inhumane of all modern weapons!

LOOK carefully at the pictures on these pages—if you’ve been wondering what we would have done in case the Axis powers had introduced deadly chemicals in the recent war.

It seems fantastic, weird and remote, now that the shooting is over. But here are the brutal facts, revealed for the first time by the Army’s Chemical Warfare Service. It was alert and ready to retaliate in heaping measure had our enemies used gas. Although the U. S. is not a party to any treaty or other agreement not to use gas, we have long been committed to the policy that we would not resort to this horrible weapon unless it was first employed by our foes. The fact that our troops were fully prepared for offensive and defensive gas warfare undoubtedly stopped the Axis from challenging us on this score.

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Zipper Gas Mask Made for Babies (May, 1934)

Zipper Gas Mask Made for Babies
A special handbag for carrying babies furnishes protection in case of a war-time gas attack. An oxygen tank begins to function as soon as the zipper cover is closed, supplying air to the baby.

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