Archive
Tag "golf"
Office Putting Course Is a Rug in Its Spare Time (Jul, 1961)

Office Putting Course Is a Rug in Its Spare Time

Golfing executives who practice putting in the office can really go first class with the new “Cocktail Golf” rug.

The miniature three-hole golf course is a textured rug made of nylon with a putting course laid out in different colors and pile depths. The holes are three soft rubber practice cups. There’s a built-up rough around the edge, a smooth, flat fairway, depressed sand traps and even a water hazard in the center.

With the cups removed, it’s an attractive rug in an abstract pattern. At-home golfers could use it as well in a den or living room. It’s made by Carter Bros. Rug Co., Chattanooga 5, Tenn.

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AUTOMAT CLEANS AND PAINTS GOLF BALLS (Mar, 1931)

AUTOMAT CLEANS AND PAINTS GOLF BALLS

Drop a coin in the slot and this machine will automatically clean and paint your golf balls. Electric mechanism dips the ball in a mixture of lacquer, then holds it in a strong current of warm air and when dry delivers it to the player ready for use. One of the machines is now in use on a Los Angeles, Calif., golf course.

The device is appropriately shaped like a huge golf ball on a tee.

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Tom Thumb Golf- A $125,000,000 Industry (Jan, 1931)

Tom Thumb Golf- A $125,000,000 Industry

by ROLAND GRAY

Midget golf, which burst on the country last summer, is more than a fad, more than a game—it’s a gigantic new amusement industry which is coining millions of dollars for the men back of it. It’s a living example of the power of an idea to lift a man into the multi-millionaire class overnight. This is a behind-the-scenes article on an American phenomenon which has shaken the entire amusement industry.

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Golfer Sights Green in Thirty-Foot Periscope (Nov, 1936)

Golfer Sights Green in Thirty-Foot Periscope
When hazards are mountain-high, a golfer really needs a periscope. There is one hole on the Aberdovey course in North Wales where the green, only 165 yards away, is quite out of sight and it’s not safe to drive until you have peeked in the periscope to learn whether the foursome ahead has putted down and moved out of the way. The periscope is thirty feet high. Sand hills form the natural hazard that obscures the view from the tee.

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Rubber Clubs Add Zest to Golf (Jun, 1930)

Rubber Clubs Add Zest to Golf

A NEW type of rubber driver holds the interest of Harvey Firestone, Sr., rubber magnate, shown here with James Thomson, of New York, at Ormond Beach, Fla. This is the type of club which Mr. Firestone is using in his play against the elder John D. Rockefeller. The head of the driver is faced with wood over lead filling.

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“PUTT-PUTT” Takes COUNTRY by STORM (Aug, 1930)

“PUTT-PUTT” Takes COUNTRY by STORM

The ancient and honorable game of golf has gone Scotch with a vengeance. Long a pastime requiring broad acres, expensive club-houses and equipment, the game has now moved into the city within access of all — and it costs only a quarter.

MINIATURE golf courses, which are on the increase in several states, are now being equipped for night golf through a new system of illumination and the game, played under flood lights, is becoming a country-wide craze.

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Rides Golf Course in Silent Car (May, 1934)

Rides Golf Course in Silent Car

ABLE to travel across hazards, over fairways and through the rough, this odd three wheeled vehicle shown above is used by Tom Lesure, greens keeper at the Pasadena, Cal., Municipal Golf Course, in patrolling the well known California links.

The car is light enough for use on any part of the course without tearing up the turf, and as it drives through a friction clutch and is well muffled, there is no noise to disturb players.

The use of this car saves Mr. Lesure not only hours of time, but an average of 16 miles walking every day.

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PERISCOPE ON GOLF COURSE GIVES VIEW OVER LOW HILL (Jun, 1933)

PERISCOPE ON GOLF COURSE GIVES VIEW OVER LOW HILL
Probably one of the most unusual golf devices in the world is on a Canadian course at Victoria, B. C. A small hill rises between the ninth and tenth holes, making it impossible for a golfer to see where to aim his ball. To remedy this difficulty, a periscope approximately twelve feet in height has been erected at the ninth hole, as illustrated at right. Before driving toward the hidden hole, a player gets his bearings by looking over the hill through the periscope.

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BOW-AND-ARROW GOLF IS LATEST DIVERSION (Oct, 1923)

BOW-AND-ARROW GOLF IS LATEST DIVERSION

Playing golf with bows and arrows, instead of the usual clubs and balls, is the latest diversion in the sporting world. Golfers of no mean ability have been defeated by as many as 20 strokes in contests with archers who shoot arrows from the tees to the cups. With the bow and arrow, “drives” of 250 and 300 yards are said to be a common occurrence, while the accuracy of approach to the greens would make any golfer envious. One thing is certain, any archer making the rounds of a course is never troubled by the “ball” overrunning the putting green. Neither do wet greens and fairways, nor the scientifically placed bunkers and traps, prove a hindrance to his game, or to the serenity of his temper.

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Lightweight, Transparent Rain Suit for Golfers (Oct, 1940)

It looks like she is defying God to strike her dead with a lightning bolt.

Lightweight, Transparent Rain Suit for Golfers

Protection from rain, without noticeable weight or interference with the wearer’s freedom of movement, is afforded golfers by a transparent rain suit. The suit consists of a long-sleeved jacket and trousers.

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