Archive
Tag "guns"
Battery Flashlight Gives Positive Gun Sight in Darkness (Mar, 1932)

Battery Flashlight Gives Positive Gun Sight in Darkness

A GUN sight for night firing, which may be attached to any revolver or pistol, has recently been patented and will soon be marketed by Ray Helm of Chicago, Ill.

The device, which has been especially designed for night police duty, consists of six small powerful condensers, an electric bulb, a special reflector, and a switch to make contact with small batteries.

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Salesmen Beware! (Nov, 1952)

Salesmen Beware!

This photo of the model Winchester (p. 146, Feb. ’52 S&M) was taken with an antique box camera and I couldn’t get as close as I’d like to. I used a powdered graphite method for the blued steel effect on the wooden model and it sure made the breech shine in the fading sun. I am now ambitiously looking forward to the Colt .44 as the next wooden gun project. That sign at the entrance of the driveway really works—no more bother with insurance, magazine, or other salesmen.

Guernsey Farm – Charles A. Wegner
Pittsville, Wisconsin

You shouldn’t have tipped your hand, Charlie. Next thing you know you’ll have some salesman trying to sell you powdered graphite . . .

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LATEST SUBMACHINE GUN IS DESIGNED FOR MASS PRODUCTION (Apr, 1941)

LATEST SUBMACHINE GUN IS DESIGNED FOR MASS PRODUCTION

ANEW submachine gun which shoots .45 caliber automatic , pistol bullets at the rate of 500 a minute is now being- turned out by the Harrington and Richardson Arms Company, of Worcester, Mass., at the rate of 1,000 guns a day.

Although in its present form the gun weighs only 6-1/2 pounds as compared with the 9-3/4-pound Thompson submachine gun and the U.S. Army’s new 9-1/2 pound Garand rifle, the inventor, Eugene G. Reising, is confident that eventually he will cut its weight down close to the five pounds which the War Department considers ideal for parachute troops, air infantry, motorcycle riders, and the close-up work of mechanized units.

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Machine Gun Fires Rocket Bullets (Jul, 1934)

Machine Gun Fires Rocket Bullets

A MACHINE gun hardly heavier than an air rifle, yet capable of firing 700 shots a minute with almost no recoil and no possibility of overheating, was recently ‘announced by its inventor, Clyde Farrell of San Francisco.

Special bullets receive only an initial impetus from the firing pin, and generate their own energy in flight, just as do rockets. All remaining energy is released when contact is made with the target.

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Desperadoes Attempt Jail Break With Home-made Pistols (Apr, 1933)

Desperadoes Attempt Jail Break With Home-made Pistols

MECHANICAL ingenuity serves many purposes, the latest and strangest being its application to plans for a jailbreak at Folsom Prison, California.

Two desperadoes, Marty Colson, in for murder, and Lloyd Sampsell, “Yachting” robber, worked for months with their own hands and prison tools making pistols for the big day. Finally, armed with these weapons, they made a desperate attempt at freedom, held up five employees in the administration building, and sent a message to summon the warden.

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Amazing Secret TRAFFIC in Gang DEATH MACHINES (Feb, 1933)

Amazing Secret TRAFFIC in Gang DEATH MACHINES

If you are an honest, law-abiding citizen, you can’t buy a sub-machine gun—but if you’re a gangster you’ll have no trouble. The author tells here how the underworld carries on an amazing secret traffic in machine guns and other deadly weapons.

by STERLING GLEASON

FOUR men walked down a busy city street. Except that their right arms hung rather stiffly at their sides, their appearance would have attracted no attention anywhere.

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GUNS from All NATIONS Stock MOVIE Arsenals (Feb, 1934)

GUNS from All NATIONS Stock MOVIE Arsenals

THE machine guns of the beleaguered garrison, making a last stand, are rattling and spitting fire at an enemy whose rifles and revolvers crack viciously in reply. Casualties are strewn everywhere and the acrid smoke of battle hovers over the scene. It is a critical situation, indeed—or appears so.

Then the director shouts “cut,” and the “dead” and “wounded” arise and brush themselves off. For it is only a scene from a current talkie, and no one is really “wounded in action.”

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Duelists Break Custom; Shoot Selves In Target Practice (Apr, 1935)

Duelists Break Custom; Shoot Selves In Target Practice

QUITE contrary to the ancient custom of duelling, the members of the Southern California Colectors Association have evolved a bloodless version of the honorable art, using life-sized photographic enlargements of themselves as targets.

One of the club members, a photographer by profession, struck upon the idea, and now the members are staging regular contests, shooting with old guns from their collections.

A circle over the heart is the bull’s eye; concentric circles extending over the other vital parts of the body provide a wide range scoring basis.

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Outshooting the Guns of Gangland (May, 1936)

Outshooting the Guns of Gangland

by STERLING GLEASON

The radio police officer is a new breed of marksman, expertly trained to snapshooting at fleeing targets from emergency positions. The six-gun man of the old West originated this deadly technique, which is simply draw and shoot without seemingly taking aim. But constant practice makes a man a dead shot regardless of the target.

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Uncle Sam’s Shooting Gallery (Sep, 1940)

Uncle Sam’s Shooting Gallery

AMERICA’S BEST SHOTS RUB ELBOWS WITH DUBS AT GUNPOWDER JUBILEE

RUN BY THE U. S. ARMY FOR SPORT AND DEFENSE

By Edward W. Murtfeldt

TRAVELING in planes, trains, buses, private cars, trucks, and even on foot, more than 10,000 eager men, women, and youngsters from all corners of the nation will head toward the shores of Lake Erie in mid-August for the largest sporting event in the world. The lure that draws this myriad of bankers, housewives, G-men, clerks, police, shopkeepers, and citizens from practically every other walk of life, is the annual National Rifle Matches sponsored jointly by the U. S. War Department and the National Rifle Association.

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