Archive
Tag "hearing aids"
LOUD NOISES HELP THE DEAF (Sep, 1933)

LOUD NOISES HELP THE DEAF
Based on the theory that exercise of the eardrums aids certain cases of defective hearing, Dr. J. B. Prager, of New York City, has devised a phonograph that subjects patients, through earphones, to loud noises. His records include dynamite explosions, the shrieking and clanging of fire engines, thunderstorms, and waves beating on rocks. Knobs on a panel resembling a giant radio set regulate the volume. The full blast of a fire siren may at first produce only a pleasant tingling in the ears, Dr. Prager reports.

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Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs (Aug, 1930)

The false ears for the deaf on the second page are the definite winner in this group.

Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs

PATS ROUGE ON. Tiresome work with the fingers is unnecessary in applying cosmetics if this new electric machine is used. Two soft pads, mounted on vibrating arms, alternately tap the face, landing more than a hundred strokes a minute. The device plugs into any light socket.

CARDS CAN’T BLOW AWAY. With one of these tables bridge can be played at the beach in defiance of wind. Metal clips are arranged to hold the dummy hand, the cards being played in the center of the table, and also the individual tricks as taken.

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