Archive
Tag "hoaxes"
Is there a Sea Serpent? (Sep, 1934)

Is there a Sea Serpent?

RECENT startling events have revived the ocean’s greatest unsolved mystery—Is there a sea serpent? Startling apparitions have evoked an amazed reply of “Yes!”, which downright fakes have turned to a wisecracking “No!” But best scientific opinion refuses to deny flatly, that somewhere, in the deepest depths of the ocean, there may be such a thing, a species unknown to modern science.

This possibility appears amazingly real in the light of the sensational tales of the last nine months that have made the sea serpent come alive again, after years of quiescence. For almost all these tales are told not by one person, but by hundreds. All vow they have seen marine monsters like nothing known, and in several different places. Nearly two hundred canny Scots have seen something that undoubtedly inhabits Loch Ness, inland lake in northern Scotland. In the Pacific ocean, near Vancouver, three score testify to having seen a sea monster. High officers of the liner, “Mauretania,” wrote in the log book recently that they saw one in the Atlantic.

.
The WORLD’S MOST COSTLY BLUNDERS (Jun, 1935)

I like this passage:
“BLUNDERS and hoaxes have embarrassed millions of persons, have changed the course of history, and have cost their victims millions of dollars. Science itself has been the cause of blunders. Early theories, that were accepted as fact, are still used to fool a gullible public and to sell stock in perpetual motion machines and schemes to convert base metals into gold.”

Yes, that gullible, gullible public.

The WORLD’S MOST COSTLY BLUNDERS

Eighty years before Lindbergh, the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic was reported. That blunder is no greater than other misleading tales that have fooled the world. Here are history’s outstanding blunders and hoaxes.

by H. H. SLAWSON

BLUNDERS and hoaxes have embarrassed millions of persons, have changed the course of history, and have cost their victims millions of dollars. Science itself has been the cause of blunders. Early theories, that were accepted as fact, are still used to fool a gullible public and to sell stock in perpetual motion machines and schemes to convert base metals into gold.

In many cases newspapers have been the victim of hoaxes and blunders. The general attitude is to blame the newspapers for carelessness, but speed is so important to a highly competitive news gathering organization that little time can be devoted to checking back on stories.

One of the greatest journalistic blunders occurred in 1844 when a New York newspaper reported the sensational news of the first successful flight across the Atlantic. The story gave a very convincing account of the purported landing of a balloon near Charleston, S. C, after crossing the Atlantic from Europe in the astounding time of three days.

.