Archive
Tag "hobbies"
A GIFT FOR GIFT WRAPPING (Dec, 1950)

I still say this magazine should be called either “Profiles in Sadness” or “Profitable Hobbies for Widows and Widowers”.

A GIFT FOR GIFT WRAPPING

Imagination, not expensive materials, produces the most attractive gift packages, says a California woman noted for her original wrappings and lectures on the subject.

HELEN ELLSBERG
Photographs by Alex Vierheller and Aaron Rubino

THE SUCCESS of Mrs. William J. Roth’s hobby of gift wrapping sometimes causes her to live her seasons in advance.

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Scale-Model Farm (Apr, 1948)

I really like the glossy saturated color printing they used in the mid-40′s.

Scale-Model Farm

LEOPOLD ARMBRUSTER, recovering from a leg ailment, found he was a top-flight miniaturist.

He laid a board on his lap (for a bench) and started whittling out a farm building. His fingers flew. His farm grew. In six months it was a vast table-top establishment complete with eight buildings, cows, horses, sheep, hogs, rabbits, chickens, pigeons, people and wagons—all boiled down to a scale of 1/4 in. to 1 ft.—a masterpiece of fine detail.

His buildings come apart and are fully equipped with rooms, furniture, stalls, chutes, etc. Animals and men are molded of clay.

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FLEECY RUGS FROM SHEEP PELTS (Mar, 1950)

FLEECY RUGS FROM SHEEP PELTS

Two Louisiana women discover that they can increase the monetary value of a sheep pelt nine times by turning it into a fluffy, white rug.

WALLY SCHULZ

Living near De Ridder, Louisiana, are two hobbyists who don’t count sheep (when they retire for the evening) but do count sheep pelts. They are Mrs. Virginia Dittmeyer and Mrs. Dot Graber, who live in the sheep-raising territory of their home state.

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Hobbyists’ Workbench Folds to Suitcase Size (Mar, 1948)

Hobbyists’ Workbench Folds to Suitcase Size

Model hobbyists now can fold up their benches and equipment and take them out into ‘the field during model tests and trials. Weighing only 11 pounds empty, a combination tool kit and workbench made of aluminum folds to the size of a large suitcase.

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HOBBY PARADE (Mar, 1950)

HOBBY PARADE

Profitable Hobbies will pay $2 for each article accepted for Hobby Parade. Send material to Hobby Parade Editor, Profitable Hobbies, 24th and Burlington, Kansas City 16, Missouri. No contributions to this department can be returned.

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He Found Comfort in Copper (Mar, 1950)

I have about a half dozen issues of this magazine and most of the articles are like this. I’m pretty sure around 1958 they changed the title to “Profiles in Sadness”.

He Found Comfort in Copper

Photographs by Erika from European

JOHN S. KREUTZER of Brooklyn, New York, has found an exciting and creative hobby to fill the lonely hours of his now solitary life.

The 70-year-old naturalized American, who came to the United States in 1905 from a part of Hungary, which is now Czechoslovakia, has worked as a tool and die maker for the greater part of his life.

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Model Plane Masterpiece (Oct, 1954)

Model Plane Masterpiece

ONE of the most beautifully designed and carefully constructed model airplanes you are apt to run into in many a moon is the F-92 Black Leopard, built by young Robert F. Shaw, San Pedro, Calif.

Bob, a hydraulic press operator for North American Aircraft, took five years to complete his prodigious task, spending a total of $42 for parts and materials.

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Old-Time Railroad is His Backyard Hobby (Apr, 1948)

Old-Time Railroad is His Backyard Hobby

By John Edwin Hogg

ON Ardendale Road, north of San Gabriel, California, passing motorists are treated to a sight which makes them stare, blink their eyes, and then stare again.

Puffing through the orange groves they see a ghost of the past. It is the locomotive, “Sidney Dillon,” gaudily painted and guilded relic of one of the most romantic eras in railroading’s history.

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HIS SCRAPBOOK IS REAL ENCYCLOPEDIA (Oct, 1931)

HIS SCRAPBOOK IS REAL ENCYCLOPEDIA

Five years ago Arthur Carlson, subway worker of Brooklyn, N. Y., began to clip interesting articles from Popular Science Monthly and other magazines. Now he has a 140-page “encyclopedia” that would be the envy of many a scrapbook devotee. Spending eight hours a day, it would take about a week or two, he estimates, to read it through.

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Silk-Screen Stenciling… A Profitable Hobby (May, 1945)

Silk-Screen Stenciling… A Profitable Hobby

HOW POSTERS, GREETING CARDS, DECORATED MATS, AND ART WORK CAN BE REPRODUCED IN QUANTITY WITH SIMPLE HOMEMADE EQUIPMENT

By J. I. Biegeleisen.

YOU can hardly go through an ordinary day without coming across many articles printed by silk screen. Tablecloths, glasses, trays, book jackets, posters—these are but a few examples of the variety of decorative materials made possible with the silk-screen process.

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