Archive
Tag "homosexuality"
Why Homosexuals Resist Cure (Feb, 1964)

This article is interesting in what the author doesn’t say. He doesn’t say that homosexuality can or cannot be “cured”. He also doesn’t say it should be cured if it can be. He says it is “advisable” but there are a lot of ways to take that. And in the last paragraph he recommends liberalized sex laws.

In all it seems like a sort of big hypothetical to ease people into being slightly more understanding and compassionate towards gays.

Here is a scan of the article referenced at the end: “A Radically New Sex Law”.

Why Homosexuals Resist Cure

Some of the reasons that make it difficult to change homosexuals by psychotherapy.

by Donald Webster Cory and John P. LeRoy.

Mr. Cory is the well-known author of “The Homosexual in America” and editor of “Homosexuality: A Cross-Cultural Approach.”

Mr. LeRoy is a free-lance writer.

Amid a tangle of contradictory reports, there is a growing belief that homosexuality can be “cured” and that the homosexual can be changed — if he wants to be.

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THE HOMOSEXUAL CRUSADERS (Dec, 1967)

I have no idea if the Templars were gay or not, but in general people will admit to pretty much anything when you torture them.

Also, apparently it was all the damn Moslem’s fault.

THE HOMOSEXUAL CRUSADERS

There is good evidence that history’s boldest warriors belonged to a secret homosexual order

By RICHARD STILLER, M.A.
Mr. Stiller, a former associate editor of this magazine, is now a writer in the medical and health fields.

Few historical events have so seized the imagination of Western Civilization as the great Crusades of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. From these passionate efforts of Christian Europe to wrest its holy places in Palestine from the Mohammedans have come down our most virile ideal: the warrior in a sacred cause.

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THE CALL GIRL WHO CLAIMS SHE’S A VIRGIN (Nov, 1959)

Must have been a slow news week. They manage to take half the article to string out the idea that she *might* be a lesbian. Googling her name I found that I had posted another article featuring her and other teacher/call girls from around the same time.

She later went on to write an apparently salacious yet frank book about her days as call girl. What I found most interesting (at least in the post I read) was the idea that a woman’s prison was the only place a woman could safely be openly gay. According to the blurb, she was not, in fact a virgin when she got into the business. Shocker I know.

Also a somewhat disturbing quote about her father that intimated a possibly abusive father and/or the public’s fascination with the Freud: “My father was a shadowy figure in my life, scarcely distinguishable from any other big man with a hat and cigar”.

-book blurb via the excellent (though slightly NSFW) blog Pulp International.

INSIDE THE McMANUS MYSTERY… THE CALL GIRL WHO CLAIMS SHE’S A VIRGIN

BY JAMES KERR MILLER

THE NAME “VIRGINIA” is derived from the word “virgin”. And, incredible as it might seem, it’s quite possible the most talked-about call girl in the country today is aptly named.

We’re referring to Virginia McManus, the beautiful blonde who, until recently, followed the school-teaching profession in Brooklyn, by day, while allegedly following the world’s oldest profession in Manhattan, by night.

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a radically new SEX LAW (Jan, 1964)

This was a remarkably progressive law for 1961. Texas enforced it’s anti-sodomy laws up until 2003 when a 6-3 decision of the supreme court ruled them unconstitutional.

a radically new SEX LAW

Private sex acts of any nature between consenting adults, says Illinois. are no longer illegal. By Donald Webster Cory and John P. LeRoy

Mr. Cory is the well-known author of “The Homosexual in America” and editor of “Homosexuality: A Cross-Cultural Approach.”
Mr. LeRoy is a free-lance writer.

The laws under which American men and women are regulated in their sexual behavior and are punished for sexual transgressions are written in the 50 different state penal codes of the United States and are interpreted in the courts of 50 states.

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