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Tag "ice"
MUIR GLACIER VISIBLE AFTER NINE YEARS (Feb, 1909)

MUIR GLACIER VISIBLE AFTER NINE YEARS

By KATHERINE LOUISE SMITH

SOMETHING wonderful has recently taken place in Alaska. This is the drifting away of icebergs from the front of Muir Glacier in Glacier Bay so that for the first time in nine years this famous glacier, the father of all glaciers, and the most noted on this continent has been visited.

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FIGHTING FOR LIFE IN ANTARCTIC ICE (Sep, 1915)

FIGHTING FOR LIFE IN ANTARCTIC ICE

By Dale Carnagey

R. MAWSON’S recent voyage into the antarctic world was one of the most remarkable from a scientific standpoint that has ever been made. He did not attempt to reach the pole; his aim was scientific research and he succeeded famously. The scientific importance of his discoveries make him one of the world’s greatest explorers.

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They Still Cut Ice the Old Way (Dec, 1947)

They Still Cut Ice the Old Way

HARVEST time is approaching on the Black River at Carthage, N. Y., where the New York Central Railroad still cuts an annual crop of natural ice. It will cool next summer’s milk cars, passengers’ drinking water, and be used in cabooses for the convenience of freight-train crews.

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ICE-ISLAND in Mid-Atlantic Proposed (Oct, 1932)

ICE-ISLAND in Mid-Atlantic Proposed

SEADROMES for ocean landing fields are not a new idea, a steel ‘drome designed by Edward Armstrong, recently described in these pages, being well on the road to practical acceptance. But the proposal to build seadromes of ice, recently advanced from Germany, seems fantastic until one realizes that the idea has already passed the experimental stage with flying colors.

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Automatic Machine Cuts Ice Into Small Cubes (May, 1938)

Automatic Machine Cuts Ice Into Small Cubes

THIS machine saws a 300-pound piece of ice into standard size ice cubes in about seven minutes. The cake of ice stands on its end on a small elevator. As the sawing progresses, the block of ice is automatically raised about one and one-half inches at a time. The top of the cake is cut off by a horizontal saw to make an ice slab of the correct thickness. This slab then is subjected to the action of two sets of vertical saws, so that the ice is cut lengthwise and crosswise into cubes which then drop into the iceman’s bag, or are carried to storage by a conveyor. The clean “snow” resulting from the cutting can be used for many purposes, and is stored within the cabinet in a box which is easily emptied while the device is operating. The machine is entirely automatic and safe.

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