Archive
Tag "Japan"
Man’s Hell on Earth! (Oct, 1937)

Man’s Hell on Earth!

Natural lakes of boiling water, spitting sulphuric flames, boiling mud, and incandescent lava, furnish the settings for a group of hideous demons which are worshipped even to this day.

By A. N. Mirzaoff

NOT long ago a group of French explorers came across a small group of islands off the southern tip of the Island of Kyushu or Kiushiu, Japan. Although there is nothing new about the existence of these islands, the average student knows little of their history.

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HOW YOU LOOK TO THE JAPS (May, 1942)

Considering that this was published just a few months after Pearl Harbor it seems amazingly mild and reasonable.

HOW YOU LOOK TO THE JAPS

DO YOU believe that the Japanese launched their attack as a form of national suicide? If so, you’re wrong. They have dared to attack the most powerful nation in the world simply because they believe our national characteristics prove us to be vulnerable.

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DOCTOR RESTORES “LOST VIRGINITY” (Jul, 1964)

Ignoring the actual content of the article, I would just like to point out that “more than 10,000″ is not “countless”. It’s actually a pretty specific number.

Also, read the “Report From the Future” on the second page to learn Hugo Gernsback’s plan to cure racial tension in the U.S. by turning all the black people white.

DOCTOR RESTORES “LOST VIRGINITY”

The unusual story of a doctor who has “re-created” more than 10,000 virgins.

Countless brides in Japan say they owe their happy marriage to Dr. Kohei Matsukubo, a 50-year-old plastic surgeon of Tokyo. More than 10,000 operations have been performed by this doctor to give women (including some Western women) new hymens. His story was told recently in the Canadian publication Chinatown News by Robert Metcalfe.

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Uncle Sam’s New Ocean Empire (Jun, 1938)

And three years later Japan gave us their response.(video)

Uncle Sam’s New Ocean Empire

ADVENTUROUS COLONISTS CLAIM STRATEGIC PACIFIC ISLANDS FOR THE STARS AND STRIPES.

By ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC

WITH the recent landing of colonists on sun-baked Canton and Enderbury Islands in the mid-Pacific, Uncle Sam launches a momentous program to extend his domains.

Naval supremacy in the Far East, leadership in bridging the Pacific with commercial airways, ownership of vast new stores of mineral treasure—all these are at stake in the first major move to hoist the American flag over new land since we purchased the Virgin Islands from Denmark in 1917.

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Japan – An Economical Travel Opportunity for 1932… (Feb, 1932)

Japan – An Economical Travel Opportunity for 1932…

Ceremonials out of the 6th Century offer one key to the real life of Japan today—fast limited trains and the great hotels offer another! 1932 visitors may enjoy it all—the ancient and the modem—at unexpected low cost on a series of inclusive tours prepared by the Japan Tourist Bureau, a noncommercial organization.

On a 14-day trip you may enjoy Yokohama, Tokyo, Kyoto, Kobe, see Miyanoshita, Nikko and the Kamakura Buddha, motor to Fujiyama, feed the sacred deer at Nara, glimpse the choicest regions of the Empire. In 21, 28, 35 of more days, wider territory may he covered at correspondingly low cost. All tours may be made independently or with a courier.

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Jap Auto Is Traveling Postoffice (Jun, 1934)

Jap Auto Is Traveling Postoffice

A POSTOFFICE is always at hand when passengers arrive or embark from any ship at the Japanese seaport village of Kobe. An enterprising postmaster has set up offices in the rear of an odd automobile. He follows the crowds around the water front, selling postal supplies to sailors and travellers. The car is powered with a motorcycle engine.

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Why Japan Can’t Win on Land (Mar, 1945)

Apparently even in 1945 the stereotype about how the Japanese just copy from everyone and have no originality was in full force.

Why Japan Can’t Win on Land

The Nips are doomed when they meet us in the open. Their tanks and guns can’t match ours.

BY GOLD V. SANDERS
Photographs by WILLIAM W. MORRIS Drawings by STEWART ROUSE

WHEN MacArthur’s invading infantrymen broke away from the Lingayen beachheads into the valleys of central Luzon, they started a new and decisive phase of the land war in the Pacific. Now, at last, we had the Japs in the open where we could get at them with the weight and power of our superior armor and guns. We knew what the result would be, from a cold-blooded comparison of their weapons with ours. We have captured Japanese war equipment of all kinds; our ordnance experts have studied it and found it second-rate, or worse.

The Japs are the world’s most brazen copycats. Nobody knows this better than our specialists whose duty it is to examine and test their weapons of war. These experts will also tell you that the Japs are not even good at copying. However assiduously they attempt to duplicate a good weapon of another power, they never succeed in equaling it in quality and performance. In outward appearance their version may look like an exact copy of the original, but closer examination reveals crude workmanship and a low standard of dimension tolerances. Actual testing shows up the defects to be expected from such workmanship and engineering.

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Jap Cars Shown (Very Early Toyotas) (Jan, 1948)

Wow, this is just the beginning of Toyota’s reemergence after WWII. According to the blurb they only made about 2700 cars a year. Currently they are the second largest car company in the world and produce close to ten million cars a year. That car is actually kinda snazzy, it reminds me of a mashup of a BMW (the grille) and Beetle (the body).

Jap Cars Shown
These first products of Japan’s postwar Automobile industry, recently displayed in Tokyo, don’t mean that Nippon’s citizens will abandon their walking habits. The entire output of the Toyota Motor Co., at Nagoya, is only some 30 cars and 200 trucks a month. These will be sold to hospitals, to government agencies, and to business firms. The passenger car, seating four, has a 27-hp., four-cylinder engine, a speed of 54 m.p.h., and will average 40 miles to the gallon. The one-half-ton trucks have the same power plant, but a different gear ratio and will do about 30 miles on a gallon. The cars will sell for 250,000 yen ($5,000), and the trucks for the equivalent of $3,200.

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“Little America” In Japan (Jun, 1950)

JAPANESE get a capsule-size view of the U.S.A. at the America Fair, sponsored by newspapers in Nishinomiya. Covering 75 acres, the fair includes models of famed American buildings as well as such natural phenomena as Grand Canyon, in miniature, of course. New York City’s sky line is represented by a detailed scale model as are many of Washington’s impressive buildings. On the lighter side are exhibits of bingo games and slot machines! Even the famous sculptures on Mount Rushmore have been skillfully reproduced, with a strange Oriental look.

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Demonic Japs (Jan, 1945)

This is a crazy racist cover depicting Japanese soldiers as some kind of demonic, green, bomb throwing mutants.

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