Archive
Tag "mail"
Eye Magnet / Mailbox / Water Walking (Nov, 1928)

How is that mailbox an improvement?

REMOVES METAL PARTICLES FROM EYES WITH RING MAGNET DESIGNED IN ENGLAND
ONE of the latest developments in the field of medical science is the ring magnet. It is proving of great value in removing pieces of metal from the eye after an accident. Workers in various industries often suffer from flying pieces of metal striking the eye. To remove such small particles is often a delicate operation whose pain is greatly lessened through the use of this ingenious device.

.
TREE TRUNK IS POSTOFFICE FOR ENTIRE COMMUNITY / RIVER JORDAN DAM (Mar, 1924)

TREE TRUNK IS POSTOFFICE FOR ENTIRE COMMUNITY

Covered with letter boxes, a giant tree has been turned into a postoffice by residents of a small community near New York City. Around the single trunk are grouped twenty-eight depositories from which mail is regularly received or collected. Because of its central location, the spot also serves as an open-air civic center and meeting place.

.
FLYING POST OFFICE (Jun, 1946)

FLYING POST OFFICE

A 200 mph. “flying post-office” using the Fairchild Packet cargo plane, is in the offing, according to a recent announcement by Post Office Department and Air Transport Association officials.

The plane will be equipped with unique facilities for storing and sorting mail in flight which, coupled with the plane’s great capacity, long range and ease of loading will give far faster airmail service between major American cities than is now possible.

The plane is capable of carrying up to seven tons of airmail in its squared fuselage.

.
A Whole Mess of Stuff I Couldn’t Easily Separate (Dec, 1929)

Graphic Section

All the characteristics of a mammoth ocean liner are reproduced in the “Columbus,” the miniature ship shown above. It is 25 feet long and was constructed by a German engineer at a cost of #4000. Top photo shows the model coming into dock under its own power after a practice spin; below it appears a close-up of the ship. It is driven by an electric motor.

Neil Hamilton, movie actor, demonstrates a revolving camera for taking “dizzy” shots in which rooms and people tumble all over the screen.

Novel Automobile Is Driven By a Single Wheel at Rear.

.
Postal flyers Succeed Against Odds in “Bringing” Mail Through (Jul, 1930)

Postal flyers Succeed Against Odds in “Bringing” Mail Through

AT NOON, May 15, 1918, four pilots stood beside their planes ready to take off on the first official attempt to carry mail by air. That day was the beginning of a thing that has spread, not only through the United States, but into all of North America. Since that day millions of dollars have been spent, planes have been wrecked, and pilots killed, but the air mail goes on and it stands today as one of the great affairs of the nation.

.
Air Torpedo Speeds Mail Delivery (Mar, 1932)

Air Torpedo Speeds Mail Delivery

THE speediest thing yet in the way of devices to facilitate mail delivery is an air torpedo which has recently been introduced in Germany. The invention of a Berlin engineer, Herr Richard Pfautz, the vehicle speeds from city to city on a special overhead trolley, which carries the current to power the two electric propeller motors situated at each end of the cylinder, as shown in the accompanying photo.

.
NEW MAIL PLANE HIDES WHEELS AS IT RISES (Dec, 1930)

That sure is an interesting way to refuel a plane…

NEW MAIL PLANE HIDES WHEELS AS IT RISES

When the newest of the mail planes leaves the ground, the landing wheels swing backward and tuck themselves away in the lower side of the wing. A study in streamlining, the 158-mile-an-hour “Boeing Monomail” is shaped so that its speedy passage through the sky meets with the least possible air resistance. Recently the all-metal craft was placed in regular service on the air mail route between Chicago and San Francisco.

A glance at this low-wing monoplane’s lines shows how far airplane designers have progressed since the “bird-cage” biplanes, crisscrossed with struts and wire braces, of fifteen years ago. The “Mono-mail’s” fuselage tapers like a cigar, and is broken only by a low windshield for the pilot. Around the motor a newly-developed type of cowling further reduces wind resistance.

.