Archive
Tag "mining"
WONDERS OF AN UNDERGROUND WORLD (Feb, 1909)

The Wieliczka Salt Mine looks pretty amazing.

WONDERS OF AN UNDERGROUND WORLD

By BERLIN CORRESPONDENT

TECHNICAL WORLD MAGAZINE

WELL known to European tourists but passed by most globe trotters —who in their hurried journey across seas and continents, have no time to bestow on anything outside of the beaten tracks—are the salt mines of Wieliczka, Galicia, whose origin is lost in the darkness of the times, while their history is traced to about 1000 A. D. After being temporarily abandoned as a consequence of Tartar incursions and the resulting depopulation and impoverishment of the country, they were restored during the reign of Boleslas by immigrating Hungarian miners.

.
Helium Once Worth $5,000 Costs under Two Cents (Dec, 1936)

It looks like Helium will remain cheap, at least for a few more years. (BTW, every single publication I saw felt the need to make a Helium pun in the headline)

Helium Once Worth $5,000 Costs under Two Cents
Twenty years ago it would have cost you $5,000 to buy enough helium gas to inflate a small balloon about two and one-half feet in diameter. Today the same amount of gas can be had for one and one-half cents. The drastic reduction in the price of helium since 1916 is due to the discovery by the U. S. Bureau of Mines of a method of recovering helium from natural gas instead of from the air.

.
GUARDING INDUSTRIAL WORKERS AGAINST Demon of Dust (Jun, 1936)

GUARDING INDUSTRIAL WORKERS AGAINST Demon of Dust

Scientific Sleuths Give an Invisible Public Enemy the Third Degree with Odd Instruments

By Walter E. Burton

N AN amazing laboratory at Pittsburgh, Pa., a group of scientific sleuths are waging a never-ending war to protect American workers everywhere from the insidious and deadly menace of industrial dusts.

.
Glimpses of of Men in the Public Eye (May, 1929)

Glimpses of of Men in the Public Eye

WHEN, a little more than ten years ago, Edward R. Armstrong first propounded his idea of building a series of great floating airdromes and anchoring them at intervals across the Atlantic to provide way stations for a regular flying service between America and Europe, the public regarded it as a fantastic dream. Aviation experts took the idea more seriously. Armstrong’s words, as consulting engineer in charge of mechanical and chemical experimental development for the Du Pont company, carried authority. Still, realization of the project was considered a thing of the dim future.

.
COAL DIGGERS AND DYNAMITE OUST HOMES (Mar, 1924)

Wow, it must have really sucked for the people who still lived in the neighborhood…

I’m waiting on confirmation Charlie, but it looks like this happened in South Scranton, PA.

COAL DIGGERS AND DYNAMITE OUST HOMES

Steam shovels, locomotives, and dynamite have invaded a residential section of a Pennsylvania city to mine a rich vein of coal that was recently found under the district. Yawning gorges have been blown and dug into the earth at the sides of the streets, where the rumble of heavy machinery is punctuated with blasts of explosives. Great lengths of railroad track have been laid in a winding path through the neighborhood to carry the mined fuel away. Guard rails were built on the brinks of the deep openings to prevent accidents to unwary pedestrians. Thousands of tons of soil, rock, and anthracite coal have been torn from the land since operations began.

.
Emergency Coal Mines (Apr, 1933)

Emergency Coal Mines

Use Old Automobiles to Furnish Power

Out of work and unwilling to remain idle, men in Pennsylvania have formed small groups and are working coal mines on their own, selling the output in neighboring towns. To supply the necessary power, they have rigged up old automobiles. The one at the right, geared to a shaker, is used to sort coal.

.