Archive
Tag "models"
ADAM and EVE in PLASTIC (Nov, 1950)

ADAM and EVE in PLASTIC

SCIENCE is resurrecting Adam and Eve but the 1950 editions are a bit different from the originals. Talking, transparent reproductions of a woman and man which reveal in natural color every detail of the human anatomy are being built in Germany for exhibition at London’s British Food Fair.

Recorded lectures will seem to be the voices of the statues as they deliver talks on health, diet and hygiene while various parts of the anatomy light up to demonstrate specific points. Statues are the brainchildren of scientist Franz Tschackert.

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COWBOY IS SCULPTOR (May, 1929)

COWBOY IS SCULPTOR

PERHAPS Charlie Beal made mud pies when he was a kid. At any rate, the erstwhile Glacier National park cowboy amuses himself and many tourists with his clay models of objects and people in the park.

The photo below shows him with his latest creation, “A Stage Coach En Route.” Every characteristic of both the coach and animals is modeled in minute detail. The team of six horses straining to get the heavy stage over the crest of a hill is one of his best.

It provides a striking contrast to the huge trains of busses which now travel through the park. “Oldtimers” who have viewed the cowboy’s stage, declare that he has reproduced a famous old coach.

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OIL FIELD IN HIS GARAGE (Nov, 1954)

OIL FIELD IN HIS GARAGE

Fred Perry, Pittsburgh. Pa., hobbyist, has spent years making this working model of an early 1900 Pennsylvania oil field which stands on a platform in his garage.

Miniature powerhouse supplies jack pumps with power to bring oil from wells to nearby tanks. Pipelines then carry it to the storage tanks.

Here Perry tightens bolt on tiny jack pump with one of the special tools he had to make himself in order to assemble and maintain his oil field.

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Model Monsters (Aug, 1945)

Model Monsters

Copied live or more times lifeline. ordinary insects are earful, fantastic creatures.

BY ALICE GRAY

Senior Technician, Department of Insects and Spiders, American Museum of Natural History AMONG the most startling exhibits in a museum of natural history are enlarged models of small or microscopic creatures which, though always with us, commonly pass unnoticed or unseen. A housefly as big as a house-cat is a terrifying object, with a weird blank face like the mask of a Martian monster, and an uncouth coat of spines. A flea, made large enough to serve six at dinner, stands revealed as most admirably streamlined, and thus enabled to slip unimpeded between hairs.

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Mr. Cooper’s Miniature Steamer (May, 1956)

Mr. Cooper’s Miniature Steamer

From cab to cowcatcher this baby iron horse is all there.

Photographed for MI by Peter Gowland.

FOR W.A. COOPER of Arcadia, Calif., an ex-Canadian Pacific machinist, small steam locomotives have been a lifetime preoccupation. At 14 he built a model engine entirely of wood; the smooth little American 4-4-0 he now operates is a far cry from that.

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MI GOLDEN HAMMER AWARD WINNERS (Nov, 1954)

MI GOLDEN HAMMER AWARD WINNERS

Grandfather clock features a moving moon dial and chimes. Constructed in spare time by postal clerk, Melvin E. Johnson, Baltimore. Photo sent by Mrs. Johnson.

Bookcase-wall cabinet piece is made of attractive knotty pine finished with orange shellac. Samuel Robertino, Stamford, Conn.

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BUILDING IS MODELED AS BIRTHDAY CAKE (May, 1929)

I remember this building from when I lived in Minneapolis. It was built by Wilber Foshay, a utility magnate who was later convicted for running a pyramid scheme. Check out the Wikipedia entry for an interesting story about its dedication celebration. Apparently Foshay hired John Philip Sousa compose a march for the occasion but it was only played that one time because his check to Sousa bounced. It wasn’t until some investors in Minnesota paid his bill that it was heard again.

It seems like every time I read about Sousa it has something to with copyright or music piracy.

BUILDING IS MODELED AS BIRTHDAY CAKE

SUGAR and flour were used in building up the birthday cake model of the Foshay building pictured in the photo at the right. The Foshay tower, built in the city of Minneapolis, was recently described in the pages of Modern Mechanics. The birthday cake held the center of the table at a dinner given in San Francisco to celebrate the opening of the W. B. Foshay building in that city.

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MASTER OF MOCKUP (Jun, 1946)

MASTER OF MOCKUP

BY Don Romero

Impossible? The man does it immediately and perfectly.

THEODORE ENGBERT modestly calls himself a cabinet maker. Actually he is an “Aladdin’s Lamp” for clients who require the impossible almost immediately. Short of a Brooklyn Bridge or a Holland Tunnel, Engbert can build anything—and produce it with the speed of a genie. And if he can’t build the actual object, he can so realistically duplicate it in wood that for all visual purposes his “mock-up” will be indistinguishable from the real thing.

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models to order (Aug, 1951)

models to order

Just dream up a gadget and the Slonim brothers will make you a model. They’ve already sold over 10 million miniatures to the U.S. armed forces.

By Harry Kursh

TWO brothers were responsible for the greatest combined Army-Navy catastrophe in America’s wartime history. In one day, two U.S. Navy submarines and their supply ship were mistakenly bombed and destroyed by a flight of B-25′s. Not far away, a squadron of Navy TBF’s was obliterated by a shattering volley from anti-aircraft guns.

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Wild West in Miniature (Mar, 1950)

Wild West in Miniature

1. The stagecoach is here! And for keeps, thanks to Mary Crouch who has carved a tiny western town out of wood. Three years of research went into the project.

2. Mrs. Crouch’s son and helper. Worth, envies the rough but colorful life of the frontiersmen who enliven the realistic village with its 14-foot-long Main Street.

3. Runaway horses are so life like that the look of horror on the lovely lassie’s face seems only natural. Yapping dog, too, contributes his share to the excitement.

4. Artistic Mrs. Crouch of Los Angeles dabs the last bit of paint on one of her 6-inch figures. She has refused offers of $6000 for this exhibit but sells other carvings.

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