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Tag "movie cameras"
Cyclographic Camera Photographs Speedy Mechanical Motion (Oct, 1921)

Cyclographic Camera Photographs Speedy Mechanical Motion

By G. H. DACY

THE most remarkable development in modern photography is centered in the cyclographic camera recently devised and perfected by Dr. T.E. Eckhardt and his assistants at the Washington laboratories of the National Bureau of Standards. This special camera is a masterpiece of photographic skill, as it takes pictures of things on the fly, traveling at such excessive velocities that no other camera under the sun is qualified to get a picture of their flight.

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Cameras go round in circles to take pictures for two fairs (Apr, 1964)

Cameras go round in circles to take pictures for two fairs

Photographers are being kept busy shooting exhibits. Movies filmed in New York will tell the city’s story in a circular theater at the New York World’s Fair. Color slides of Alpine scenes will cover an entire dome at Lausanne’s National Exhibition.

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MAKE AND PROJECT YOUR OWN MOVIES (Apr, 1917)

MAKE AND PROJECT YOUR OWN MOVIES

By MERWIN DELAWAY

AT last the person interested either in movies or in photography has a real chance to follow his bent for one of the two and at the same time get enjoyment from the other interest. A complete outfit, including raw film, camera, and projector, is now being manufactured and offered to the public at a price which makes those who bought outfits in times gone by, think that Millennium has come.

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Brownie Movie Camera: Color movies cost less than you think (Oct, 1952)

Color movies cost less than you think

You can match this gorgeous color movie —in seven full-length movie scenes—for under $1.

8mm. Kodachrome Film is so economical, less than $1 makes a little color movie like you see here … finished and ready to show.

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Movie Camera Is Also Projector (Mar, 1935)

Movie Camera Is Also Projector
FILMS may be projected as well as taken with a midget home movie camera marketed recently for amateur use. A tiny but powerful electric motor operated by four flashlight cells drives the film during exposure, and supplies power for the projector bulb. The film used is 9-1/2 mm. wide, but has a picture area about the same as that of 16 mm. film, since perforations are in the center between the frames. The camera has a fast f 2.5 lens, giving usually clear pictures.

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CAMERA MAKES EIGHT MOVIES ON ONE FILM (Jun, 1936)

CAMERA MAKES EIGHT MOVIES ON ONE FILM
By making eight successive rows of pictures upon a single strip of standard film, a pocket movie camera designed by a British actor approaches the ultimate in economy. As many as 144 of its midget views are packed in the space that five full-size frames would occupy. Mechanism within the camera automatically shifts the exposures from one row to the next without interrupting the picture-taking, and a similar mechanism is used in projection. The illustrations show the new camera and a sample of developed film.

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Movies of Television Show Provide Permanent Record (Mar, 1948)

Movies of Television Show Provide Permanent Record
With a 1200-foot magazine that permits continuous recording of a half-hour program, a specially designed movie camera photographs television programs directly from the monitor tube at the broadcasting station. The double-chamber magazine holds both unexposed and exposed film and can be removed in a lighted room. The camera will be used by stations to provide a permanent record of their programs.

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