Archive
Tag "musical instruments"
Telegrams Ride the Tones of Electric Organ (Oct, 1938)

Telegrams Ride the Tones of Electric Organ

Telegraph engineers have learned from the electric organ how to send ninety-six telegraphic messages in one direction over a single wire at the same time. They borrowed from the Hammond organ the idea of dispatching multiple messages on different tone pitches.

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PIANO SIZE PIPE ORGAN FOR HOMES (Jun, 1930)

PIANO SIZE PIPE ORGAN FOR HOMES

Only its double keyboard, a row of stops above it, and an inconspicuous pipe at the rear reveal that the latest musical instrument for the home is an organ. In size and form it looks like a piano. But within the case are concealed 231 pipes that, it is claimed, equal in richness and variety of tone the effects produced by pipe organs of great size. The “baby” organ is designed especially for dwellings of moderate size. An average-sized living room offers adequate space for it.

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SEVEN BOYS PLAY BIG HARMONICA (Feb, 1932)

These kids should get themselves a midget brass section.

SEVEN BOYS PLAY BIG HARMONICA

Seven boys are needed to play a huge harmonica recently demonstrated at Detroit, Mich., and which is declared to be the largest of its kind in the world. It measures eight feet in length, giving sufficient space for each performer to render the part assigned to him in music orchestrated especially for the big instrument. There are 770 notes in all on the scale of the gigantic mouth organ.

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Six Persons Play Giant Accordion at Once (Oct, 1937)

Six Persons Play Giant Accordion at Once

Six persons can play simultaneously on a gigantic accordion recently exhibited in Germany. Over six feet high, the mammoth musical instrument has a keyboard covering more than ten octaves. Casters at the base facilitate the manipulation of the bellows.

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Blow, Pedestrian, Blow (Apr, 1948)

Blow, Pedestrian, Blow

Much has been written about careless driving and traffic hazards in Los Angeles, but Hilton Tupman, of that city, has done something about it. Carrying his six-pound pedestrian horn, shown above, he honks his way across streets, warning over-eager motorists that even the lowly foot-traveler has some rights. The tank holds air under pressure of 500 lb. A trigger release under the handle sounds it off, good and loud.

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