Archive
Tag "new in science"
SCIENCE IN PICTURES (Aug, 1945)

SCIENCE IN PICTURES

Mechanical “Wings” with which the inventor hopes he will be able to fly, are the work of 36-year-old Horace T. Pentecost of Seattle. In his right hand he holds the flight control stick: its handle is the throttle, regulated by turning. The “Hoppicopter,” as the inventor calls it, has a 2-cylinder, 20 hp. motor and weighs 60 pounds plus.

Precipitron an electrostatic air cleaner made by Westinghouse, cleans 23,000 cubic feet of air per minute in this room where lenses for naval optical instruments like periscopes are checked.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (Nov, 1954)

NEW in SCIENCE

Two Dutch girls inject preservative chemicals into flowers in a Dusseldorf, Germany, flower shop. Chemicals keep flowers fresh for months.

These sight and hearing glasses, available in various colors and shapes, have a built-in hearing aid complete with batteries and microphone.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (Dec, 1952)

NEW in SCIENCE

Hydrofoil Bus is claimed by its German inventor to be the fastest passenger boat in the world. In a demonstration on Lake Lucerne, Switzerland, it carried 32 people 50 mph. Motor is 350 hp. Hydraulic wings lift it high in the water.

Mail Pushcart replaces the usual mailbag for Irving Wonnacott of Oak Park, Ill. Local post office tested several models to ease delivery of magazine and periodicals, decided on this one. It holds more than bag, saves wear and tear on postmen.

.
NEW IN SCIENCE (May, 1950)

NEW IN SCIENCE

High Soarer: the Switchette in the right hand of Mrs. Dolores Mohlmann reached an altitude of 250 miles—higher than any other man-made article. It was attached to a two-stage rocket (model in left hand) and was used to discharge a smaller rocket at an altitude of 20 miles. Portion of tail section with this gadget was found at White Sands.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (May, 1950)

NEW in SCIENCE

Static Garter protects you from static electricity explosions in textile mills, and chemical and munition plants. The device consists of a garter connected by chain to a contact pin clipped to the sole. Thus static charges are grounded to a conductive floor. Walter G. Legge, N. Y.

Window Salesman makes customers out of window shoppers. It’s a tape recording device which takes orders from outside by means of a mike inserted in the window. Practical jokers will find it expensive because it will cost them a quarter a shot. Gimbels, Philadelphia.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (Jan, 1954)

NEW in SCIENCE

DOREKA two-film camera invented by German engineer holds color, regular film. It has twin interchangeable lenses with coupled range finder, synchronized flash. Device bars double exposure. Shutter speeds range from 1 to 1/500 of a second.

EASIMOW, left, new 16-inch, power-driven mower and roller will do job 30 per cent faster than other mowers, its makers claim. It was demonstrated recently at the National Association of Groundsmen’s Annual Exhibit. Hurlingham, England.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (Sep, 1954)

NEW in SCIENCE

SAPPER SHOES that inflate. English Army’s latest anti-mine device distributes man’s weight, reduces pressure, makes mine-walking much safer.

ELECTRONIC THERMOMETER is first change made in clinical type since introduction of mercury column one in 1867. Col. Peter Perkins developed it.

ELECTRIC LIFE SAVER invented by Peter Sosnoski and installed in switchbox is claimed to prevent electrocution and fires due to faulty wiring.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (Mar, 1950)

NEW in SCIENCE

Cosmic Lab is 2250 feet under the shores of Lake Cayuga near Ithaca, N.Y. Here, Lowell M. Bollinger, Cornell University scientist, checks a geiger counter he has installed to study cosmic ray particles which smash deep into the earth from outer space. The laboratory is located in an abandoned salt mine which was tunneled Far under the lake’s surface.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (Aug, 1951)

NEW in SCIENCE

Uranium Test Kit designed to fit in your pocket, will make a positive identification in five minutes. Chemical bead is formed on wire, fused with crushed ore, then examined for lemon-yellow fluorescence under Ultra-Violet light. Menlo Lab., Menlo Park, Calif.

Dust Collector made from four tank-type vacuum cleaners measures soil erosion in conservation research at Kansas State College. The portable wind tunnel, rear, starts the dust flying. Samples are taken at four different heights in tunnel.

.
NEW in SCIENCE (Jun, 1953)

Wow, those are some phallic looking toy rockets.

NEW in SCIENCE

MINIATURE ROCKET exhibited at toy fair in Nurnberg, Germany, is propelled by a mixture of water and compressed air. Pump is in launching handle. Rocket can reach altitude of oyer 160 it.

HOME IN A BALL on display at the International Auto Show in Frankfurt, Germany, is hemispherical, easily carried on car’s roof. It costs about $160 and is manufactured by Otto Roseman of Bavaria.

SPORTS KIDDIE CAR is 62 in. long, 30 in. wide with 6-volt battery and speed of 5 miles an hour. It has accelerator, brakes and dashboard and costs about $500. Ideal Toy Corp., Hollis, N. Y.

.