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Tag "NYC"
How Much Longer Will Our Big Cities Last? (Oct, 1932)

How Much Longer Will Our Big Cities Last?

Like the dinosaur, which grew too bulky for its own good, our mammoth cities are doomed to extinction, say scientific prophets. Disintegration began when Lindbergh hopped the Atlantic, foreshadowing the day of interurban planes, as told here.

by RUSSELL J. MORT

SCIENTIFIC prophets looking into the future proclaim that our mammoth cities, the likes of which the world has never seen before, are doomed to obsolescence. In time, cobwebs will enshroud the cloud-piercing Empire State building and dandelions will grow on Fifth Avenue and Wall Street, they believe, after exhaustive studies into the trend of the times.

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Boxcar Homes for $3 Per Month (Feb, 1934)

Boxcar Homes for $3 Per Month

AN INNOVATION in living quarters is represented in a boxcar village which has recently sprung up in New York City.

Inhabitants of this unique village, pictured below, pay only $3 a month rent, or $6 a week for room and board—reasonable enough in these hard times.

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Airport-Docks for New York (Nov, 1931)

Airport-Docks for New York
The hardest thing in aerial travel, nowadays, is not to fly, but to get quickly to and from the airport; especially in such cities as New York. An architect, Harry B. Brainerd, has worked out a solution in connection with the great docks which will be built for the new huge liners. Roofing over the docks, as shown, will afford landing space for airplanes; while the great covered docks will serve also as hangars for dirigibles, as shown in the central slip above. Passengers can transfer almost instantaneously from ship to plane, by using the elevators. Between the slips, the available dock space will be utilized by offices, factories and warehouses. The projected port is to be 1,025×1,700 feet, pier buildings 115′ wide, 200′ high.

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His Business is Laying An Egg (Mar, 1952)

I think that an “Eggs Laid While You Wait” place would make a killing in Brooklyn today.

His Business is Laying An Egg

Everybody knows a tree grows in Brooklyn, but it took Murray Weiss’ egg farm to prove that hens could thrive there, too.

By H. W. Kellick

THERE’S a chicken ranch deep in the heart of Brooklyn where hens lay eggs while you wait.

More than 3,500 white leghorns working on the fowl line in this indoor farm deliver about 130 dozen eggs daily. And they are sold direct to the consumer.

The indoor farm, known as the Weiss-Way Egg Farm, is an idea developed by Murray Weiss. A former farmer and graduate in husbandry of the New Jersey State Agricultural School, Weiss conducts his business on a purely scientific system.

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