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Tag "radar"
Can General Old’s “Eyes” Guard America’s Heartland? (Oct, 1952)

Can General Old’s “Eyes” Guard America’s Heartland?

By JAMES JOSEPH

Special from Anchorage, Alaska. Tonight the citizens of the American “heartland”—you Chicagoans and New Yorkers, the people of Detroit and Philadelphia—will prepare for bed, blissfully confident in tomorrow. Yet while you sleep, lights are burning late here in Alaska, particularly in the somber, sandbagged headquarters of the Alaskan Command at Elmendorf Field, just outside of Anchorage. This is a building which never sleeps. For here officers of the Alaskan Command are staying up nights worrying about you “heartland” Americans.

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Teleran – “radio eyes” for blind flying! (Oct, 1946)

Teleran – “radio eyes” for blind flying!

Teleran (a contraction of TELE-vision — Radar Air Navigation) collects all of the necessary information on the ground by radar, and then instantly transmits a television picture of the assembled data to the pilot aloft in the airplane.

On his receiver the pilot sees a picture showing the position of his airplane and the position of all other aircraft near his altitude. This is superimposed upon a terrain map complete with route markings, weather conditions and unmistakable visual instructions to make his job easier.

Teleran—another achievement of RCA—is being developed with Army Air Forces co-operation by RCA Laboratories and RCA Victor. Moreover, when you buy any product bearing the RCA or RCA Victor monogram, you get one of the finest instruments of its kind science has yet achieved.

Radio Corporation of America, RCA Building, Radio City, New York 20… Listen to The RCA Victor Show, Sundays, 2:00 P.M., Eastern Standard Time, over the NBC Network.

RADIO CORPORATION of AMERICA

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Off-Center Radar Picture Tube Gives Added Forward Vision (Dec, 1955)

This is pretty remarkable. Apparently the best way to filter the results of a radar, even in as late as 1955 was to actually build the display CRT so that it just cut off part of the rear signal and fit in more of the forward signal. As opposed to some sort of tunable electronics that would allow you to change the scale and proportion displayed. This seems sort of wasteful since they obviously have front and rear signals that go out to 50 miles but are perfectly happy throwing that data away…

Off-Center Radar Picture Tube Gives Added Forward Vision

Ships can “see” 50 miles ahead and 30 miles behind with a special radar cathode-ray tube. General Electric, which developed it, calls it the “far-sighted, nearsighted radar indicator tube.” Engineers built the first tube by taking a standard 17-inch TV picture tube and installing a different phosphor screen and electron gun. Then they bent the glass neck of the tube five degrees so that the electron gun would give an off-center indication on the screen. The tube, used on Navy cargo vessels, gives added forward vision without the addition of a larger tube and a more expensive radar set.

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