Archive
Tag "scooters"
Streamlined Scooter HAS TURBINE DRIVE (Apr, 1946)

Streamlined Scooter HAS TURBINE DRIVE

DESIGNER’S DREAM CYCLE USES A 4-HP. ENGINE AND GETS 60 M.P.H.

IT SPORTS A POLISHED ALUMINUM BODY ON A LIGHT TUBULAR FRAME.

WITH an eye to the short-trip driver, quick-delivery services, and vacationists, Ray Russell, of Detroit, has designed and built an unconventional motor scooter.

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“HONEY, GUESS WHAT I JUST BOUGHT?” (May, 1980)

“HONEY, GUESS WHAT I JUST BOUGHT?”

Little by little, across America, people are bringing home a delightful accompaniment to the automobile. The Vespa scooter.

What is this two-wheel appeal? It’s a totally unique kind of transportation that combines comfort, convenience and a stylish sense of sophistication.

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Motor Scooter Burns LPG (Dec, 1955)

Motor Scooter Burns LPG
Already noted for its gas economy, the motor scooter now has been adapted to burn LPG. Ralph Carlton of Wauchula, Fla., converted his standard scooter into an LPG-burner with a few minor engine changes. Now he carries a bottle of propane lashed to the scooter’s front end.

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Model-Airplane Motor Drives Scooter (Apr, 1940)

Model-Airplane Motor Drives Scooter
Up to 230 miles on a gallon of gasoline is the economical fuel-consumption rate of a curious motorized scooter constructed by E. Roberts, of Philadelphia, Pa. Converted from a toy motor cycle, the midget vehicle is driven by a one-fifth-horsepower model-airplane engine, acting on the front rubber-tired wheel through a spring-supported friction roller. Fifteen miles an hour is top speed on level ground.

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Orange-Crate Scooter Has Ball-Bearing Wheels (Jul, 1939)

Orange-Crate Scooter Has Ball-Bearing Wheels

OLD ball bearings from the rear axle of an automobile serve as the wheels of this speedy scooter. It is made from an orange crate and a piece of board 4″ by 24″. A slot is sawed in one end of the orange crate and another near the end of the board to receive the ball-bearing wheels. The axles are cut from hardwood and forced into the inner ball race; and one side is flattened to fit against the boards, to which they are fastened with 1/4″ bolts. The board should be pivoted to the orange crate with a 3/8″ bolt. The wood is faced at this point with two pieces of sheet iron to form a bearing.

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