Archive
Tag "sexism"
SHE FLIES AND DIVES (Sep, 1915)

So, it’s an article about a woman who flies planes and goes diving, but most of the article is about who she marries. Typical.

The thing I don’t understand is the last sentence: “After his third wreck, the sinking of the S. S. Delhi, he claimed his bride.”

Does that mean he was on three separate ships that sank? Did he sink them? How is this relevant to the story?

SHE FLIES AND DIVES

AN odd compact came to fulfillment recently when Mrs. Alys McKey Bryant, the prominent aviatrice, married Jesse W. Callow, chief engineer of the Pacific Coast Steamship Company. Years before, they had come to the agreement that if, at the expiration of ten years’ time both of them were free, they would marry.

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Is Education for Women Your Blind Spot? (Oct, 1961)

A Direct Question To Corporate Managers: Is Education for Women Your Blind Spot?

How long ago is it since you hired your first college-trained woman? How much help since then have you given to the college that trained her? The fact is that the men who pioneered the world’s highest standards of business philanthropy have generally turned their backs on higher education for women, and too often kept their hands in their pockets when the colleges that educated women knocked on the door.

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THE CALL GIRL WHO CLAIMS SHE’S A VIRGIN (Nov, 1959)

Must have been a slow news week. They manage to take half the article to string out the idea that she *might* be a lesbian. Googling her name I found that I had posted another article featuring her and other teacher/call girls from around the same time.

She later went on to write an apparently salacious yet frank book about her days as call girl. What I found most interesting (at least in the post I read) was the idea that a woman’s prison was the only place a woman could safely be openly gay. According to the blurb, she was not, in fact a virgin when she got into the business. Shocker I know.

Also a somewhat disturbing quote about her father that intimated a possibly abusive father and/or the public’s fascination with the Freud: “My father was a shadowy figure in my life, scarcely distinguishable from any other big man with a hat and cigar”.

-book blurb via the excellent (though slightly NSFW) blog Pulp International.

INSIDE THE McMANUS MYSTERY… THE CALL GIRL WHO CLAIMS SHE’S A VIRGIN

BY JAMES KERR MILLER

THE NAME “VIRGINIA” is derived from the word “virgin”. And, incredible as it might seem, it’s quite possible the most talked-about call girl in the country today is aptly named.

We’re referring to Virginia McManus, the beautiful blonde who, until recently, followed the school-teaching profession in Brooklyn, by day, while allegedly following the world’s oldest profession in Manhattan, by night.

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All women are equal in this (Oct, 1932)

This is weird ad. Setting aside the blatant sexism, do the writers really think that women sat around green with envy over how many cylinders a rich woman’s car had? Also going unmentioned is the little fact that the rich woman probably had a maid to do the vacuuming.

All women are equal in this

Her car may have twelve more cylinders than yours. Her clothes may be more expensive. Her home may be bigger and its furnishings far more luxurious. But there is one thing, and as far as we know, only one thing in the appointment and equipment of the American home which is the finest that money can buy—yet most economical too. It is the Hoover Electric Cleaner…. Any woman can own it for as little as $4.50 down.

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“The loser’s stuck to take her home” (Dec, 1936)

“The loser’s stuck to take her home”

THE very boys who used to seek her out, now match to see who will be “stuck” to take her home. That’s what halitosis (bad breath) can do to a girl, without her ever suspecting the reason for the sudden change in her fortunes. Too bad that this offensive condition doesn’t announce itself to the victim instead of to the victim’s friends.

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