Archive
Tag "television technology"
TELEVISION Goes to Work (Sep, 1947)

TELEVISION Goes to Work

Television has finally grown up and is beginning to pay for its long and expensive childhood.

BY AL BERNSOHN

“THOMAS R. JOHNSON’S account, please,” the busy teller says into the phone. Back in the bank’s file room the depositor’s account sheet is placed on an easel before a fixed-focus television camera and the image of the ledger balance and Johnson’s signature flashes onto a television screen in the cashier’s cage.

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Electron Camera “Shoots” Television Images – London Station to Serve Ten Million People (Jun, 1935)

Electron Camera “Shoots” Television Images – London Station to Serve Ten Million People

Television Will Be Made Available to 10,000,000 People This Year by a London Station Which Will Alternate the Baird and Marconi Systems of Transmission; the Baird System Uses Four Types of Transmitters;

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Large Images Now Obtained by Crater Tubes (Jan, 1932)

The key to “large” screen TVs of up to 6″-8″ is simple: water cooling.

Large Images Now Obtained by Crater Tubes

THE neon crater tube has practically revolutionized the television industry over night and has lifted the art from the “peep-hole” stage into the realm of real home entertainment. True, we do not have all the elaborate detail in the images received, that we might like to have, but the crater tube has gone far to brighten up and enlarge the television image. Anyone who has seen the Jenkins television demonstrations—such as those at the New York Radio show will agree, we believe, that the neon crater tube is indeed the device we have long awaited. It requires, however, a special lens-disc, and more energy than the flat-plate lamps which it succeeds.

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