Archive
Tag "wind power"
FARMS ARE WATERED BY WIND HARNESSED TO PUMPS (Apr, 1924)

FARMS ARE WATERED BY WIND HARNESSED TO PUMPS

Windmills, resembling those common to Holland, have been found practical for irrigation and power purposes in Kansas. Sufficient water may be pumped from a depth of 75 feet to irrigate a farm of 80 acres with one of the mills which operate two pumps simultaneously.

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Noted Scientists Grapple with Food and Fuel Famine (Apr, 1923)

Noted Scientists Grapple with Food and Fuel Famine

Search for Secret Process by which Plants Harness Enormous Energy of Sunlight

By Thomas Elway

THE coal and oil supply of the , world is rapidly being used up. What shall we do when it is gone?

Practical men have been asking themselves that question for a decade, and now the scientists of America have decided to answer it. They realize that a solution must be found, or civilization will perish.

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NOVEL NEW MACHINES for PULLING POWER from the SKIES (Apr, 1933)

NOVEL NEW MACHINES for PULLING POWER from the SKIES

IN THE endless quest for cheap sources of energy, two proposals have recently been advanced which demand serious consideration, both for appeal to the imagination and the possibilities of practical operation.

The high speed windmill shown on this page is the latest development of Volf’s laboratories in New York. The first of these power producing units will be in operation by May first. Three fans are provided so that one is always facing a wind current. The fans are geared to a gyro stabilizer which runs on inertia so that the fans will not run down in calm intervals between gusts of wind.

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CHINESE WINDMILL WATERS FARM (Oct, 1933)

That’s a really nifty way to pump water!

CHINESE WINDMILL WATERS FARM
Adapting an Oriental idea for raising water for his own needs and to irrigate his fields, a California farmer has constructed the curious apparatus shown in the accompanying photographs. Power from a windmill, transmitted through gears, revolves a spiral-shaped tube of pipe open at both ends. The outside end dips into a water-filled ditch at each revolution. Water is thus picked up, and runs by gravity around the spiral to the hub as the wheel revolves. An opening in the hub dis-charges the water into a trough four feet above the level in the ditch, giving a sufficient lift for the irrigation purposes desired.

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Giant Wind Turbines (Jun, 1932)

Giant Wind Turbines

Currents in Upper Air Form Unfailing Source of Power for “Windmills” of Future

WIND, at the surface of the earth, is proverbially uncertain; but recent researches show that, a thousand feet or more above the ground, wind is comparatively steady and unfailing. This has given new life to the hope of finding a substantial source of natural power, even more universally available than water power; and the designs illustrated here have been prepared by a German engineer, Honnef, the erector of several huge radio towers. As shown here, the structure carrying the power plant would be higher than any other building man has yet been able to erect.

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Putting Nature’s Power to Work (Aug, 1932)

Putting Nature’s Power to Work

Methods of Harnessing Natural Energy Described by DICK COLE

Upward of 40,000 inventions a year are granted patents by Uncle Sam, but not one of these offers a practical solution of the problem which scientists agree is the most pressing of them all— that is, how to harness natural sources of energy for power. Mr. Cole does not profess to have solved the problem, but the methods he describes here point out the trend of probable development.

WHAT is the most needed invention? Not television—not new kinds of airplanes—not speedier automobiles. Men of science are agreed that what the world needs most is a motor which converts the sun’s rays and other forms of natural energy into usable power. Orville Wright, Lee De Forest, Elihu Thomson, and other leading scientists are among those who proclaim the need for a new motor.

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New Schemes for Harnessing the Winds (Aug, 1939)

New Schemes for Harnessing the Winds

INVENTORS PROPOSE STRANGE PLANS TO BRING THE OLD DUTCH MILL UP TO DATE

IS THE windmill coming back? With strange, unconventional types, inventors are seeking to adapt it to a modern age. Their experiments may bring new success in man’s effort for 800 years or more to harness the wind for power.

Centuries ago, people milled their flour, sawed wood, and pumped water with the picturesque European windmills whose enormous “sails” swept from earth to sky. This country contributed the smaller and more practical narrow-bladed type that pumps water on farms today. A new miniature design shaped like an airplane propeller charges storage batteries for radios and for lighting rural homes.

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Super-Windmills (Mar, 1952)

Super-Windmills

Plans are being made to harness mankind’s oldest and cheapest source of power for industry by means of huge aerogenerators.

By Frank Tinsley

THE next few years may see a decided change in the landscape of our country. In certain strategic places which promise a constant, strong wind such as mountain passes, will grow strange structures resembling the Martian machines of H. G. Wells. But these will be instruments of construction, rather than destruction —tall, steel towers supporting fans to convert wind energy into electrical power.

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Wind-Electric Plant Perfected (Nov, 1934)

Well, maybe not perfected. G.E. makes a wind turbine that generates 3.6MW; 36 times the output of this windmill. Of course it does have a diameter of 341 ft, making each of it’s blades almost as tall as this entire plant.

Mounting a 98-foot wheel atop a steel tower 82 feet high, Soviet Engineers have successfully operated a 100-kilowatt wind-electric plant in the Crimean sector for more than a year. The windwheel has self-regulating variable-pitch blades which are automatically operated by centrifugal force. The Entire machine rotates on a spherical pivot in the top of the tower. The device is kept into the wind by a small motor actuate by a weather vane.

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