THE MANUFACTURE OF FINE MIRRORS (Jun, 1917)

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THE MANUFACTURE OF FINE MIRRORS

A Trade That Is Near to an Art When milady stops before the crystal of her dresser, she doubtless does not realize the time, patience, and skill that has been put into the manufacture of this perfect image-maker. First comes the mixing of ingredients for the plate glass. This process, shown in the circular photograph at the right, is most painstaking, for the slightest flaw in the surface of a completed mirror reduces the value materially. Then the glass is made, after which its rough edges are smoothed and it is cut into the required shapes—as shown in the upper right photograph. Then the surface is made as glossy as possible—lower right picture— after which such holes are cut as the frame requires, and the smoothed plate goes to the “silver chamber”, for its many coats of backing. After these have been applied and allowed to set sufficiently, the original piece of plate glass has been transformed into a magnificent mirror or cheval glass, worthy to be set in mahogany and made the chief accomplice of any fair lady’s beauty machinations.

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