These Burroughs Sensimatic savings can be yours (Mar, 1956)

Big like Fuller Brush Company Or Small like Dy-Dee Wash, Detroit

These Burroughs Sensimatic savings can be yours

It’s the same refrain from users of Burroughs Sensimatic Accounting Machines everywhere: Far more bookkeeping done far faster—at far less cost!

“The Sensimatic 400 enables us to keep a set of purchase cards, plus our accounts receivable, at considerably less than just the receivables ledger cost previously.” So says Fuller Brush Company, Hartford, Conn. Doing an $80,000,000 volume yearly, this 50-year-old firm uses 10 Sensimatics to speed transactions with its more than 6,000 famed “Fuller Brush Men.”

And Detroit’s Dy-Dee Wash, Inc., leading local diaper service, reports: “We could double our present volume and still handle all of our records on our one Sensimatic. A lifesaver to a small office with a large number of small transactions!”

Versatile? Yes! The Sensimatic’s exclusive 4-jobs-in-l sensing panel automatically directs the Sensimatic through every general accounting operation, simple or complex. And to adapt the same machine to any new bookkeeping system—now or in the

future—just change slip-in panels. Result: Unparalleled speed, versatility, simplicity of operation and extraordinary savings … in any and every accounting operation.

For a savings-wise demonstration, call our local office. Burroughs Corporation, Detroit 32, Michigan.

Wherever There’s Business There’s Burroughs

10 comments
  1. Rutherford says: November 24, 20109:31 am

    Cool! My Aunt used to work for this company in Detroit at this time. Incidentally there is a relation here between the Burroughs company name and William S. Burroughs.

  2. Don says: November 24, 20107:55 pm

    There was one of these — or one like it — in the business department of the junior college I was going to in the early ’70s. We decided to find out how it would handle an illegal operation, so we set it up to divide some large number by zero, and turned it on. It commenced to grind and grind and grind . . . for at least two hours. Then we discovered there was no way to reset it, so we unplugged it. When it was plugged back in, it went back to calculating . . . and we never were able to get it to stop. As far as I know, it never recovered . . . .

  3. Craig Cartmill says: March 19, 20116:32 am

    The man in the photo in uniform for Dy Dee Wash – Detroit, was my father James Cartmill. Jim was an employee at Dy Dee and was a diaper delivery driver for the company at that time. I remember seeing this advertisement when I was a child. He worked his entire career at the company and went on to become President and majority shareholder of the company. Unfortunately he passed away too young (45 years old), but he accomplished his goal to lead the company to financial success and prosperity. If anyone remembers my dad or Dy Dee Wash in Detroit, I would enjoy hearing about their memories.

  4. Chris Taylor (Durban) says: April 17, 20113:38 am

    There was one of these — or one like it — in the business department of the junior college I was going to in the early ’70s. We decided to find out how it would handle an illegal operation, so we set it up to divide some large number by zero, and turned it on. It commenced to grind and grind and grind . . . for at least two hours. Then we discovered there was no way to reset it, so we unplugged it. When it was plugged back in, it went back to calculating . . . and we never were able to get it to stop. As far as I know, it never recovered . . . .

    Comment by Don — November 24, 2010 @ 7:55 pm

    Not POSSIBLE Don. This machine could not multiply or divide!

  5. Hugh Bodley says: December 26, 20116:52 am

    I worked for the Burroughs Corporation as an accounting machine salesman in three countries, South Africa, Canada and the United states, During my twelve year stint, I sold and installed many P600, Sensimatics, Sensitronics, E2000 & E4000 accounting machines to a variety of commercial enterprises and governmental institutions.

    The interesting part of the story is that each of the machines cost upward of twenty thousand dollars and did a fraction of the work that todays computers do, at a fraction of the price. But, they got the job done and paved the way.

  6. Chris Taylor says: December 26, 20119:14 am

    Very interesting Hugh. When did you sell in SA? I sold machines in England, Zambia, Keny and SA between 1967 and 1980.

  7. Toronto says: December 26, 20119:33 am

    Did both of you work for Burroughs? Or other members of the “BUNCH” as well?

    (See if I can remember: Burroughs, Univac, NCR, CDC, and Honeywell?)

  8. Chris Taylor says: December 26, 20119:41 am

    Hi Toronto!!!!!
    Yes – I left Burroughs for Sperry in 1985 and we know what happened just afterwards! Unisys!

  9. Hugh Bodley says: December 26, 201110:47 am

    Hi Chris,

    I joined Burroughs Machines LTD, Johannesburg in 1962 and emigrated to Vancouver, Canada
    in 1965, where I worked for Burroughs. In 1969, with Burroughs assistance, I emigrated to San Diego, California, where I served as a salesman, selling the L series mini computers and Zone Sales Manager. I was eventually promoted to World Headquarters, Detroit in 1974, where I was a Product Promotion Manager, Group 2, International Division. In 1975 I returned to San Diego as a Group 3 computer salesman, resigning later that year to start a new career in commercial real estate.

  10. Hugh Bodley says: December 26, 201110:51 am

    By the way Chris, I was brought up in Lusaka, Northern Rhodesia and went to boarding school at Kingswood College, Grahamstown, South Africa, four days on the school train.

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