WHERE HEALTH IS PUT UP IN BOTTLES (Nov, 1940)

|<<
<< Previous
1 of 2
|<<
<< Previous
1 of 2

WHERE HEALTH IS PUT UP IN BOTTLES

SIX OUNCES of grass juice. Prescriptions such as that are all in the day’s work for Abraham G. Balfour. Fresh bottled grass juice, which is said to vie with spinach as a source of calcium and vitamins, is but one of more than 700 varieties of fruit and vegetable juices and their blends which he produces in his Englewood, N. J., laboratory. His unique factory is running twenty-four hours a day, and shipments of choice garden and orchard products from as far away as California arrive at Englewood on a daily schedule.

Balfour’s unusual business began five years ago. A dietician engaged in vitamin research, he became interested in the possibilities of obtaining concentrated vitamin fluids from various plants and fruits. Special machines, such as a whirling plate that cuts vegetable pulp into shreds one ten-thousandth of an inch thick, and a press which squeezes out juice with a pressure of eighteen tons, have been, developed for the work. Among the most popular products of the Englewood laboratory, in addition to grass, banana, watercress, carrot, and spinach juices, are a combination of tomato and horse-radish juices and a blend of the fluids squeezed from celery and timothy hay. In various ways, by-products of the laboratory are turned to profit. Orange peels are candied; celery hearts are sold to local restaurants; cherry skins go to chewing-gum manufacturers who obtain from them a waxlike preservative. Customers even from abroad send for Balfour’s “vitamin juices.” One man, in Zurich, Switzerland, recently ordered a bottle of his favorite juice sent across the Atlantic by Clipper plane. The cost was one dollar for the juice and $9.70 for express.

0 comments
Submit comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.