White Elephant Party (Nov, 1955)

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White Elephant Party

There is only one drawback to this kind of affair: you may get back a worse eyesore than one you gave.

GETTING rid of unwanted household articles and having a good time to boot, was the purpose of a recent White Elephant Party celebrated by a group of Camden, S. C., Du Pont plant employes and their wives. The reason for such an affair is diabolically simple: find that awful gift your great-aunt Zenobia gave you a few years ago, gaily wrap it and bring it to a party where some unsuspecting soul will win it. There is only one drawback to this plan: what you win may prove to be more of a white elephant than what you gave!

3 comments
  1. Hirudinea says: December 24, 20113:53 pm

    Considering some of the stuff I’ve gotten for Christmas this might not be bad.

  2. Toronto says: December 24, 20115:36 pm

    When I was young, our Christmas Bazaars used to have a White Elephant table – every family got a ticket and the ‘prizes’ were handed out in order of the tickets being drawn. As the “five layers” of wrapping paper; these people were amateurs. I can remember things being frozen into blocks of ice, then wrapped in plastic, sewn into canvas, put into a box of excelsior with a few rolls of packing tape rolled around that. Or soldered into a coffee can, etc.

    There was always one gift that was rather nice – like enough cookies to share with everyone – and one gift that would get returned every year, unless the donee was transferred away.

    Hey, it was a small village and we had to make our own entertainment.

  3. Andrew L. Ayers says: December 24, 20119:18 pm

    At one place I worked, we used to have a white elephant gift exchange. Someone almost always brought in a case of beer or something (which would then be passed around like nobody’s business, at least until all the “gifts” were gone). Myself, I always liked going/taking the “weird” gifts. Since I work as a software developer, there was always something like that.

    One year, I ended up with (and nobody wanted) this Salton in-freezer ice-cream maker (basically, you put your ingredients in this small container, and then the whole machine into the freezer, leading a cord out – it had a motor to stir the mix while a fan circulates the cold air over the metal container, gradually freezing it into “soft serve” – when the motor stops, you can pull it out and eat it, or remove the paddle and let it firm up further). I still have it, and love it (though it isn’t cheap to make ice cream – heavy cream is expensive!).

    Another year, I ended up with what was titled “the 70′s computer programmer’s essentials kit” – it had a piece of old assembler code from some old mini-computer, an old HP LED programmer’s calculator (still worked!), an old desk fan, and an old 150/300 baud acoustic-coupler modem. I still have all that junk, too (the calculator being my favorite). It all came from one of the older programmers in the group, and is now a part of my “old computer stuff” collection.

    Why are you looking at me like that…? :)

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