Your business is in the Age of Electronics (May, 1954)

Your business is in the Age of Electronics

Electronic test instruments save engineering time, cut manufacturing costs at Friden

Like manufacturers in many fields, Friden Calculating; Machine Co., Inc., finds electronic test instruments save hours of engineering time and cut production costs. Friden engineers use these new measuring tools of industry to evaluate circuits, determine electrical requirements, check stability, match relay closing times and study performance of pilot models. Friden production workers use similar instruments in rigid quality control inspections.

Hewlett-Packard is a pioneer and world leader in electronic test instruments—the basic measuring tools used today throughout manufacturing and process industries, in scientific research, communications and military installations. Correct application of such equipment is of the first importance; Hewlett-Packard field engineers can tell quickly whether any of over 200 different -hp-instruments are applicable to your needs. A letter stating your requirements will receive prompt attention; investigate today!

ELECTRONIC MEASURING INSTRUMENTS

HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY
29305 PAGE MILL ROAD • PALO ALTO, CALIFORNIA
FIELD ENGINEERS IN ALL PRINCIPAL AREAS

4 comments
  1. Toronto says: January 17, 201212:38 pm

    I had no idea HP made calculators that far back. I wonder if they used RPN.

  2. Kosher Ham says: January 17, 20121:25 pm

    Notice the display on the frequency counter– this was before nixie and numitron display devices came into general use.

  3. Jari says: January 17, 20121:46 pm

    Toronto: Not yet, although as an long time HP user, an electromechanical RPN-calculator would have been cool. http://www.hpmuseum.org…

  4. Richard says: January 17, 20122:37 pm

    HP didn’t make calculators back then. That ad is talking about HP instruments being used by the Friden company for the purpose of making Friden’s products, which were electromechanical calculators. http://www.oldcalculato…

    I don’t believe Friden and HP ever had a business relationship other than one company buying the other’s products for use in supporting their business. Looks like Friden’s engineering department used HP test equipment. I’ll bet HP’s accounting department had a few Friden calculators somewhere, since they were so popular.

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