All in the Day’s Work (Sep, 1929)

It looks like that kid is trying to rip the donkey’s tail off.

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All in the Day’s Work

Ever get tired of the monotony of your job—weary of doing the same old tasks in the same old way? So do other folks, and as shown in the photos on this page, some of them adopt unusual methods of injecting a bit of fun into the job of tiring. Whether it9s a basket – balancing contest or a peanut – pushing race, a bit of sport helps to take the edge off the daily grind.

  • “Twenty baskets on the bean” might be the title for the above picture, showing a London greengrocer walking down a street doing his balancing act.
  • Above—Johnny plays with dynamite in balancing on a Missouri mule’s hind knees. Anyway, it’s an almost sure-fire method of getting a kick out of life.
  • At left — In performing this stunt the horse proceeds around the track pushing the racing gig ahead of him. It adds zest to the daily task of exercising thoroughbreds.
  • For real thrills, it’s hard to heat the structural steel worker’s job. The above photo was taken during the construction of the Woolworth building, and shows a playful workman gamboling on a girder 700 feet above the city’s streets. Question: how did he get up there? Another question: how’s he going to get down with a whole neck? The large white building in the foreground is New York’s City Hall, the dome of which is shown under construction. In the background can be seen the Brooklyn Bridge. The Woolworth building, long the tallest office structure in the world, will be outdone in size by the Chrysler Building now under construction in New York.
  • Tom McAuliffe of Los Angeles lost his arms in an accident when 9 years old, but he is an expert typist, using a pencil in his mouth to tap keys.
  • It’s a whole day’s work in itself taking care of a set of whiskers like those pictured above. The two gentlemen are forty-niners who recently met at Sacramento, Cal., to compare notes on their whiskers. After unwinding them, it was discovered that the set on the left measured 11 feet, 3 inches, while that on the right was 17 feet long. If placed end to end they would reach from here to the end of the block.
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