Archive
Dogs
IT DOESN’T HURT A BIT (Jan, 1929)

IT DOESN’T HURT A BIT

Dr. M. E. Moby, of Los Angeles, found his canine patient more unconcerned than a human patient when he used his dentist’s drill to make way for a new inlay.

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PUTTING ON THE DOG (Dec, 1958)

PUTTING ON THE DOG
IT’S said that every dog has his day. Bobbie, an upper-crust Great Dane, really has it and is he barking it up! His master, Alden J. Senegal of Los Angeles, built Bobbie a plush ranch-style doghouse which has a TV antenna, chimney, doorbell, real doggy wallpaper, blue shag rug and— a swimming pool! But life isn’t all a forest of fire hydrants; Bobbie must sleep in his master’s house every night as a watchdog.

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DOG SHOWS MUSICAL TALENT (Feb, 1929)

DOG SHOWS MUSICAL TALENT
EVERY now and then a dog is seen on the stage that seems to almost have human intelligence. This dog shows exceptional musical ability when he sits on the bench of an automatic piano and pats the keys, as the piano plays. That he has a musical sense of rhythm is shown by the fact that he pats the keys in time with the piece that is being, played. He is owned by a Berlin vaudeville performer.

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Tramp Poodle Wins Leather Boots in Long Hike Across the Country (Nov, 1929)

Tramp Poodle Wins Leather Boots in Long Hike Across the Country

UNLESS a tramp poodle dog is lucky as a hitch-hiker he needs boots for a cross-country hike. C. C. Maupin, of Philadelphia, left New York on a hike to Los Angeles. At West Newton, Pennsylvania, he was adopted by the poodle shown at the left and they continued the hike together. About 500 miles on the way, somewhere in Indiana, the poodle had worn off its claws, making further walking impossible.

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DOG COTTAGE (Aug, 1957)

DOG COTTAGE transports tiny chihuahua from kennel-to-kennel when she competes for top honors in English dogdom. The lady’s snootful name is Dalhabboch Emima-Maud.

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These Dogs Are Really “Hot” (Apr, 1956)

Undoubtedly someone will accuse me of wanting to nuke dogs now.

These Dogs Are Really “Hot”

Radioactive beagles are pointing the way to better safety devices for workers in atomic energy plants.

A PACK of 300 sad-eyed, floppy eared beagles are serving as canine guinea pigs in an unusual University of Utah project designed to investigate the hazards of industrial radioactivity. Financed by the Atomic Energy Commission and directed by Dr. John Bowers, the studies will show what happens to bone and tissue when radioactive substances are injected into the dogs.

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Dog Rolls Tires for Sport (Feb, 1934)

Dog Rolls Tires for Sport

ROLLING old automobile tires down the street is the favorite sport of Mickey, a Boston bull dog owned by M. Brown of Venice, California.

Mickey, who always had a liking for anything that rolled, learned to pick up the tire, balance it, and keep it rolling down the street without any aid or suggestion whatsoever from his master. A skillful push with his front paws, as he runs along on his back feet, keeps the tire moving.
It just wouldn’t do to leave a new tire lying about near this dog’s territory.

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Super Dog-House (May, 1947)

Super Dog-House was made from the Plexiglas section of a bomber’s gun turret and is a novel addition to the growing number of peacetime uses of products of war. At right, three-year-old Nancy Evans, of Detroit, Mich., makes friends with a cocker puppy, one of three occupants of the latest in abodes for canines.

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Motor Ambulance Carries First Aid to Injured Dogs (Mar, 1922)

Motor Ambulance Carries First Aid to Injured Dogs

DOGS injured by autos on the roads near London, England, now are cared for by a motor ambulance. A veterinary gives first aid on the spot, and if there is hope of saving the life of the pet, it is placed on a thick bed of straw and carried to a kennel for further treatment.

The ambulance is ready for service day and night, and is summoned by telephone. All the farmers living near the roads in the district outside of London covered by this service notify headquarters as soon as they are aware that an accident has taken place, and the cyclecar immediately starts.

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Fido Gets Motorcycle Side-Car (Aug, 1931)

Fido Gets Motorcycle Side-Car
BEFORE the bicycle went modern and acquired a motor, Fido could get his Sunday airing with the rest of the family under his own power. He can never hope, however, to keep up with the speedy motorcycle, so one English dog lover has installed a miniature sidecar for Fido’s private use. The tiny sidecar is equipped with its own private celluloid windshield which folds back as shown in the photograph below, protecting the dog from the elements.

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