Archive
Animals
Star Actors of the Flea Circus (Mar, 1930)

Star Actors of the Flea Circus

by ALFRED ALBELLI

PROF. William Heckler’s Trained Flea Circus at Hubert’s Museum on West 42nd St., New York City, proves a great spectacle for the skeptical to marvel at, and at the same time the professor shows that he has bridged one of the gaps between science and practical mechanics.

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RAISE GIANT FROGS (Mar, 1937)

RAISE GIANT FROGS

SELL UP TO $5 PER DOZEN!

A New Industry! Millions used yearly!

Good Market. Prices steady. Pleasant, outdoor work. Easy to ship to any part of the country. Nation-wide market at your command.

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Chimpanzee Plugs in and Gives Wrong Numbers on Zoo Switchboard (Dec, 1929)

Chimpanzee Plugs in and Gives Wrong Numbers on Zoo Switchboard

DICK, one of the chimpanzee residents of the Luna Park Zoo in Los Angeles, California, paid a call to the zoo office the other day and while there he made friends with the telephone operator. When invited to try out the switchboard, Dick pushed and pulled plugs, particularly enjoying using the plugs when a light flashed on the board. He dispensed wrong numbers with carefree abandon and gibbered back at irate phone users who tried to “bawl him out” for his carelessness. He was removed from the chair, however, before he had an opportunity to raise a mob of protesting callers.

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SCIENCE ON SAFARI (Feb, 1947)

SCIENCE ON SAFARI

Helicopter, diving eye, and wire recorders will ferret out secrets of African jungles Jules Verne was years ahead of his time in foreseeing the value of science to the world of exploration, but the plans for Commander Attilio Gatti’s eleventh expedition to still-darkest Africa would have made even Verne’s prophetic eyes pop.

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WHAT WE HAVE IN COMMON WITH DOGS (Feb, 1947)

WHAT WE HAVE IN COMMON WITH DOGS

Scientists study canine behavior to see if it will explain our own Why are some dogs, like some humans, more active than others . . . brighter or duller . . . more dignified . . . more playful? Why, like humans, do they behave differently in groups: getting along well together or fighting . . . blindly following a leader … or keeping to themselves?

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Costly JEWELS from Butterfly Wings (Jun, 1931)

Costly JEWELS from Butterfly Wings

by Bennett Lincoln

Butterfly collecting is more than a hobby—it’s an exceedingly profitable business. A unique jewelry shop in New York deals exclusively in articles fabricated from butterfly wings, sold for as much as $5000. It’s the only one of its kind.

USUALLY mention of the word “jewelry” conjures up mental pictures of flashing diamonds, blood-red rubies, or velvety strings of pearls around the throats of beautiful women. But in New York City there is a unique jewelry shop which never deals in precious stones. Its stock in trade is expensive jewelry fabricated out of butterfly wings—lamp shades, watch cases, pendants, and other articles ornamented with insect wings splashed in gorgeous shades of color which no living artist has ever matched.

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IT DOESN’T HURT A BIT (Jan, 1929)

IT DOESN’T HURT A BIT

Dr. M. E. Moby, of Los Angeles, found his canine patient more unconcerned than a human patient when he used his dentist’s drill to make way for a new inlay.

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Oiled Balloons Limber up ‘Gators (Sep, 1931)

Oiled Balloons Limber up ‘Gators

TRAINERS at the Los Angeles alligator farm have originated a new and unique method for exercising their century old saurian charges. A few balloons liberally smeared with fish oil and then floated over the pool do the trick.

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Insects Teach Man Secrets of Invention (Sep, 1931)

Insects Teach Man Secrets of Invention

by Uthai Vincent Wilcox

Amazing inventions perfected by tiny creatures of the insect world have long baffled scientists, who are studying the remarkable accomplishments of “bug” architects, chemists and engineers to find solutions for their scientific problems.

NATURE is, above all, an inventor. She invents new devices, new processes, new ways to meet situations. Many of her amazing inventions are still fascinating mysteries. Scientists know about them, but they are unable adequately to explain them.

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Electric EYE Tests Eggs for FRESHNESS (Jul, 1932)

Electric EYE Tests Eggs for FRESHNESS

EVEN an unborn chick can have no secrets from the all-seeing eye of the photoelectric cell. Now an egg may be placed in front of one of these electric eyes, and an electrical meter, calculated in “chicken life” units, will indicate just how far the embryo chick has grown and how long it will be before the youngster will pick his way to the light.

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