Archive
Communications
Wired Radio (Sep, 1936)

This kind of thing is much cooler when Les Paul lives in your building.

Wired Radio

Musical programs now transmitted over telephone lines.

FOR many years the possibility of using electric light or telephone lines for transmitting “radio” programs has been considered. In the rather old “wired wireless” effect, the voice and music were to be impressed upon the regular house – lighting circuits at radio frequencies, and were then to be changed to audio frequencies.

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Writing with your voice (Mar, 1947)

Writing with your voice

Years ago Alexander Graham Bell dreamed of “a machine that should render visible to the eyes of the deaf, the vibrations of the air that affect our ears as sound.” He never realized that dream, but his researches led to the invention of the telephone.

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The everything set (Jun, 1979)

The everything set

It’s a carry-along entertainment and information center—AM, FM, CB, public service, aircraft, and weather bands, three-inch TV, cassette tape—along with a built-in mike and sleep switch. Six D cells power it. It’s $249.95, from Sampo, 1050 Arthur Ave., Elk Grove Village, III. 60007.

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THOUSANDS SEE AND HEAR RADIO WEDDING (Oct, 1923)

THOUSANDS SEE AND HEAR RADIO WEDDING

What is believed to be the first performance of its kind occurred in Pittsburgh recently when a wedding ceremony was performed in a large glass booth, visible to thousands attending an electrical exposition, while radio apparatus broadcast the words spoken to those at the show and countless others listening in.

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NEW RADIO SET WORKS IN YOUR CAR OR HOME (Aug, 1931)

So, apparently in 1931, tuning a car radio was even more dangerous than texting is today. Also, Google Chrome, even with enhanced Google suggestion based spell checking, does not understand the word “texting“.

NEW RADIO SET WORKS IN YOUR CAR OR HOME

A radio set that can be carried about like a suit case is designed for the convenience of fans who do not want to miss favorite programs while motoring.

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Photographic Record of Telephone Meters (Oct, 1937)

Photographic Record of Telephone Meters
INSTEAD of the usual method of reading and recording the number registered by your telephone meter, transferring this to the accounting department where the record is copied and tabulated and the bills are made out, the newest system consists of supplying a photographic record of your phone number and the meter reading with your bill.

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Tube and Tears (Apr, 1946)

Alrighty then.

Tube and Tears combine to produce this picture of progress and sorrow. The tube is the world’s most powerful radio tube, designed primarily for broadcasts directed toward specific points, so-called “beam transmissions.” Tears are supplied by 3-year-old Barry Greenwood, whose father is shop steward at the Federal Telephone and Radio plant, Clifton, N. J., where the tube was manufactured.

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RADIO “EYES” PEER INTO SPACE (Dec, 1955)

RADIO “EYES” PEER INTO SPACE

WITH STRANGE-LOOKING instruments that catch radio waves from the stars, Australian scientists are probing the mysteries of the universe. So far they have identified 100 “radio stars”—highly localized sources of cosmic static.

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SOS Detective… (Mar, 1947)

SOS Detective…

Translating distress signals into beams of light, this Navy-developed rescue aid speedily plots the position of ships or planes in trouble at sea. Tiny camera projectors interpret bearings received from direction-finding stations; the intersection of their beams on the map indicates the position of the craft in distress. The dial above the chart automatically gives the course to the position.

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Radio Amateurs Get Tower Clubhouse (Oct, 1940)

Radio Amateurs Get Tower Clubhouse

CONVERTED into an up-to-date radio station, an old stone observatory at Manchester, N. H., now serves a threefold purpose. As a public facility of the city, its short-wave outfit has been turned over to amateur radio enthusiasts, who have formed a club to share its use.

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