Archive
Crime and Police
Venetian Blinds of Steel (Oct, 1937)

Venetian Blinds of Steel

Bullet-proof steel protection for bank tellers, developed along the principle of Venetian blinds is the invention of J. A. Boivin, Quebec, Canada.

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Outwitting the Plant Smugglers (Sep, 1936)

Apparently James Nevin Miller liked to recycle.

Outwitting the Plant Smugglers

Sometimes the smuggling of plants is innocently intended—the “law breakers” never giving a thought to the dangerous pests they might bring into the country with the fruit, plants or vegetables. On the other hand, some plant smuggling is done because of the money such contraband brings.

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THE PUNISHMENT FITS THE CRIME – NSFW (Feb, 1951)

THE PUNISHMENT FITS THE CRIME

THE PICTURES on these pages, remarkable for showing the punishment inflicted for stealing in Saudi Arabia, are even more remarkable considering that pictures of any kind, photographed or painted, moving or still, are considered graven images and so arc forbidden by the Prophet in all the lands of Islam.

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BULLET BOUNCER ON CAR SAVES POLICE FROM THUGS (Dec, 1932)

BULLET BOUNCER ON CAR SAVES POLICE FROM THUGS
Bullet bouncers are now in use on cars of the San Francisco, Calif., police department to protect members of radio patrol crews from the gunfire of thugs. The contrivances are sheets of quarter-inch-thick steel plate, equipped with shuttered windows and hinged to the top of the windshield frame.

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Science In Crime Detection (Apr, 1934)

Science In Crime Detection

DETECTIVE fiction fans have always cherished the idea of the clue-finder who sees and notes everything and, at the close of his investigation, unerringly points out the culprit—who is, of course, then convicted at once in a manner unusually effective for judges, juries and prosecutors.

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COLLECTING THE NATION’S FIRE TAX (Feb, 1909)

COLLECTING THE NATION’S FIRE TAX

By HENRY S. CHASE

THIS is a story of incendiarism—a story of the lengths to which, under certain circumstances, some respected business men will go, and how and why they pass into the criminal class. This is a story showing, too, how men organize syndicates to carry on the exciting, pleasurable and profitable business of arson.

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London Bobbies Broadcast Crime News With Five-Pound Portable Radio (Mar, 1931)

London Bobbies Broadcast Crime News With Five-Pound Portable Radio

RADIO is fast becoming one of the most dangerous foes of the modern criminal. Often before he has fairly finished committing his crime, the news has gone out to all the police, broadcast over a powerful central radio station and picked up by squad cars cruising the streets.

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FINGERPRINTS TRAP “SLUG” PASSERS (Jul, 1937)

That seems like an awful lot of work just to catch someone stealing a free subway ride…

FINGERPRINTS TRAP “SLUG” PASSERS

To trap persons who insert worthless metal slugs in turnstiles, slot machines, and coin telephones, an ultra-violet-ray fingerprinting process has been developed.

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A College for Police (Apr, 1930)

A College for Police

A scene at the new Police College established by the City of New York for scientific training of officers of the law—”rookies” receiving instruction in scaling walls, with the aid of ropes, to save life at fires.

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Exposing the Stamp Racketeers (Jun, 1936)

Exposing the Stamp Racketeers

By Cleland van Dresser

WOULD you believe that a convict could manufacture “rare” stamps and sell them through a confederate stationed outside the prison walls for as high as $600 apiece?

Or that one of the best stamp dealers paid $65,000 for a block of forty-three “rarities,” only to find that he had bought a handful of cleverly tinted and engraved pieces of paper?

These incidents are selected from the files of Mrs. Catherine L. Manning, for fourteen years head of the world-renowned collection at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D. C. Most of the 10,000,000 collectors in this country probably believe very few fake stamps are foisted upon the public.

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