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“THEM DAYS ARE GONE FOREVER!” (Feb, 1951)

“THEM DAYS ARE GONE FOREVER!”

Yep, there was a time when you could buy a sirloin steak for fifteen cents!

DEARIE, if you remember when a steak smothered with onions cost you a fast fifteen cents, when horses pulled fire engines and women laced themselves into ulcer-making corsets, then you’re much older than we are—hut not by much!

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Unique Memorial to Buffalo Bill (Oct, 1921)

Unique Memorial to Buffalo Bill

By GEORGE F. PAUL

WESTERN visitors now find in the Pahaska Tepee, ten miles from the city of Denver, a unique and attractive building where memorials in many forms tell the life story of Colonel William F. Cody, the Buffalo Bill of frontier days. From the broad veranda of this structure on the side of Lookout Mountain can be seen the famous plains where Colonel Cody roamed as a scout and hunter.

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THE HOMOSEXUAL CRUSADERS (Dec, 1967)

I have no idea if the Templars were gay or not, but in general people will admit to pretty much anything when you torture them.

Also, apparently it was all the damn Moslem’s fault.

THE HOMOSEXUAL CRUSADERS

There is good evidence that history’s boldest warriors belonged to a secret homosexual order

By RICHARD STILLER, M.A.
Mr. Stiller, a former associate editor of this magazine, is now a writer in the medical and health fields.

Few historical events have so seized the imagination of Western Civilization as the great Crusades of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. From these passionate efforts of Christian Europe to wrest its holy places in Palestine from the Mohammedans have come down our most virile ideal: the warrior in a sacred cause.

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FIGHTING FOR LIFE IN ANTARCTIC ICE (Sep, 1915)

FIGHTING FOR LIFE IN ANTARCTIC ICE

By Dale Carnagey

R. MAWSON’S recent voyage into the antarctic world was one of the most remarkable from a scientific standpoint that has ever been made. He did not attempt to reach the pole; his aim was scientific research and he succeeded famously. The scientific importance of his discoveries make him one of the world’s greatest explorers.

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Fat Herman’s Chariot (Nov, 1954)

Fat Herman’s Chariot

WHEN Corporal Richard Dutot of New Hyde Park. L. I., was stationed in Germany, he was bitten by the car bug after riding in a German friend’s Mercedes-Benz—one of four cars that was made especially for former Nazi Air Marshal, Herman Goering.

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Flying Daredevils of 20 YEARS AGO (May, 1929)

There’s a great Radio Lab segment about Lincoln Beachy you should really listen to.

Flying Daredevils of 20 YEARS AGO

By HI SIBLEY

America’s first Aviation Meet was held in Los Angeles in 1910, with all the aerial daredevils of the time among those present. In this absorbing article, Mr. Sibley points out interesting contrasts between air heroes of today and yesterday.

IT HAS been said, with a good deal of truth, that the days of the flying daredevil are gone forever. True, pilots still put their machines through impossible maneuvers and extricate themselves from risky situations, but the airplanes they use are so dependable and sturdy that the public no longer looks upon these stunts as involving any element of personal danger.

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Giant Mt. Rushmore Memorial Completed (Jan, 1942)

Giant Mt. Rushmore Memorial Completed

HUGE faces of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln and Theodore Roosevelt carved atop 6,200-foot Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills of South Dakota were recently completed, after 14 years of blasting and chiseling by famed Gutzon Borglum. The faces are of a size proportionate to men 465 feet tall. Borglum died last year and the great task was finished by his son.

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BIG-AS-A-MINUTE MEN (Sep, 1954)

BIG-AS-A-MINUTE MEN

Don’t underestimate the power of a midget. Some of the world’s “biggest” men are 2-1/2-footers.

By Lester David

BOB CAIN, on the mound for the Detroit Tigers, stared openmouthed. Umpire Hurley couldn’t believe his eyes and 20,299 fans rubbed theirs in amazement. Advancing to the plate, bat slung over his shoulder, was the tiniest baseball player since Abner Doubleday invented the national pastime.

He was Eddie Gaedel, a midget, signed secretly a short while before by Bill Veeck, then owner of the St. Louis Browns. Veeck, a fast man with any gimmick that would boost receipts, had been waiting for a chance to spring his small surprise package.

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TOWN PUMP’S END (Jun, 1949)

TOWN PUMP’S END

Saginaw gives it civic burial when new water finally conies in Twenty years ago the city of Saginaw, Mich, erected a $2 million water-pumping plant, but it made the mistake of drawing its water from the Saginaw River, where chemical plants and other factories dumped their waste. A way was found to purify the water bacteriologically, but it still tasted like aqua nausea.

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Freak Airships of the Ancients Reputed to Have Flown (Oct, 1930)

Freak Airships of the Ancients Reputed to Have Flown

RECORDS of almost every ancient tribe will show among its traditions the legend of some member who achieved the miracle of flight, either through the use of wings or other devices more closely resembling modern airplanes. And the extraordinary part of it is that there are one or two instances, apparently well authenticated, which record flights that were actually successful.

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