Archive
Photography
SPEED OF MACHINE AND MAN CAUGHT BY CAMERA (Jan, 1924)

SPEED OF MACHINE AND MAN CAUGHT BY CAMERA

Thrills that electrified spectators at an automobile race and soccer game are reproduced by lucky “snaps” of quick-action cameras. The player in one picture has just made a goal by bunting the ball through the posts with his head, a feat seldom witnessed, but the photographer caught the play.

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MINOX B CAMERA has built-in EXPOSURE METER (Sep, 1958)

MINOX B CAMERA has built-in EXPOSURE METER

You’ll have fun shooting magnificent perfectly exposed pictures (3″ x 4″ and Larger) with this new marvel of West German precision engineering. The Minox B (weighs but 3-1/4 oz., only 3-7/8″ long) eliminates guesswork. It’s quick, sure, simple to use

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Photobooth – Up to $600 WEEKLY (Apr, 1946)

Up to $600 WEEKLY

with new 5 min. photo equipment. No experience necessary. Write:

FEDERAL IDENTIFICATION
Dept. K 1012 N.W. 17
Oklahoma City, Okla.

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Enlarger for Your Candid Camera Made From Globe (Oct, 1937)

Enlarger for Your Candid Camera

By Wayne Daniel Clegg

How many times have you looked into the window of a photo store, admired the expensive miniature enlargers and longed to be the proud possessor of one? But your pocket reveals your total financial resources—three precious dollars. With that money and a little time and energy, there is no reason why you cannot have a miniature enlarger just as attractive and efficient as a factory-made model.

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Hunting Miniatures (Sep, 1936)

Hunting Miniatures

24,000 pieces in world’s largest museum of the smallest articles.

ONE of the most remarkable exhibitions of miniatures, which has been collected painstakingly over a period of sixteen years by Mr. Jules Charbeneau, is on exhibition in St. Louis.

The articles come from thirty countries and the collection consists of 24,000 different items.

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Printing Photos on Any Material (Mar, 1940)

Printing Photos on Any Material

KENNETH MURRAY TELLS HOW TO SENSITIZE CLOTH, CHINA, GLASS, AND METAL

IN A NEW YORK store window a demonstrator recently attracted crowds by making photographic prints before their eyes on a variety of materials. He daubed a little solution on the surface where the picture was to be placed and, as soon as it had dried, placed a negative over it, clamped it in position with a piece of glass and a rubber band or two, and exposed the picture to the light of a photoflood bulb for a short time.

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Photographic Record of Telephone Meters (Oct, 1937)

Photographic Record of Telephone Meters
INSTEAD of the usual method of reading and recording the number registered by your telephone meter, transferring this to the accounting department where the record is copied and tabulated and the bills are made out, the newest system consists of supplying a photographic record of your phone number and the meter reading with your bill.

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Delivery Cars That Advertise (Feb, 1930)

Delivery Cars That Advertise

SOME unique delivery trucks and wagons are used by Los Angeles merchants, and one of the most odd is the car shown below.

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Turn Snapshots Into ‘HUMANETTES’ (Nov, 1936)

Turn Snapshots Into ‘HUMANETTES’

Sensational invention. Almost human in appearance. A life-like cut out figure. Any snapshot, photograph or picture can be “immortalized” by this strange new process. Surface covered with moisture-proof transparent PORCELITE. Will not peel, tear, crack, or soil. Looks like porcelain bas-relief.

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1/25,000 of a second of surgery (Jan, 1947)

This is the same camera I posted an article about yesterday (Snap Happy Camera). Apparently a year after it was shown in MI the Army decided to use it in an ad. It looks they used almost the exact same photos. They seem close enough that I’m wondering if the Army ad just painted over the guy’s hand in the originals used in the MI article.

1/25,000 of a second of surgery

Here it is… the clinical recording camera. Developed by the Army Signal Corps for the surgeons of the Medical Department, it can “stop” an intricate operation with a silent, built-in flash lasting 1/25,000 of a second!

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