Archive
Automotive
Obsolete Autos Utilized To Teach Safe Driving (Feb, 1937)

Obsolete Autos Utilized To Teach Safe Driving
A NOVEL and practical way of training high school students to be safe drivers has been developed at the Lane Technical School in Chicago, Ill. Obsolete autos are cut down until only the driver’s seat, brake, clutch and shifting lever controls remain. These are used as desks by the students.
The controls are wired to lamps mounted on a panel in the classroom which enables the instructor, William A. Sears, to check each student’s reaction to traffic situations flashed onto a motion picture screen. After this primary instruction, the students drive real cars over a $35,000 practice course featuring every type of lane, curve, grade, etc.

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Pooch Is Up to His Neck In Automobile (Sep, 1954)

I’m not sure why, but this just seems wrong to me.

Pooch Is Up to His Neck In Automobile
European cars are small and have no room for large dogs, so an ingenious dog lover has converted the trunk into a roomy traveling kennel. A hole cut in the trunk lid permits the dog to get air and, if he desires, to see where he has been, at least.

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“Carfeteria” Serves Motorists at Wheel (Oct, 1949)

Boy, with a snazzy name like Carfeteria I can’t understand why these never took off.

“Carfeteria” Serves Motorists at Wheel

Eating is made easv for motorists who patronize the wheellike Los Angeles Motor-mat shown above. Spokes of the wheel are tracks along which run small carriages. You drive into one of the 20 stalls, where a carriage and menu are waiting, make your selection, write the order, and press a button. Presto! the carriage whizzes into the kitchen, stopping along the way only long enough for an attendant to figure the cost. In a few minutes the meal is shot back to your car. When you have finished eating from a lap tray, you put the empty dishes back in the carriage-plus the price of the meal.

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Safety Belt Devised For Car (Jul, 1938)

Safety Belt Devised For Car
DESIGNED to hold passengers firmly in their seats in event of a crash so that they will not be thrown violently against the car interior, a newly developed safety belt for automobiles may eliminate injuries attributed to this cause.

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Police Squad Rides Tiny Motor Scooters (Feb, 1939)

This reminds me of Cartman. I can totally see that cop screaming “Respect my authoritah!”

Police Traffic Squad Rides Motor Scooters
A SPECIAL traffic squad mounted on powered scooters is a feature of the Police Department of Inglewood, Calif. Use of the scooters, which can travel at a speed of 30 m.p.h. and cruise for 130 miles on a gallon of gasoline, enables policemen to patrol longer beats more efficiently than they could shorter beats on foot and has decreased the number of cases of motorists who try to “beat” traffic lights at street intersections.

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Gyro-Wheel Car (Jun, 1935)

Gyro-Wheel Car Zooms Along On Giant Tires At 116 m.p.h.

RADICAL in design, a pleasure vehicle, known as the “gyrauto,” has been introduced in Europe to replace the orthodox type of automobile in use today.

Designed by Ernest Fraquelli, young Italian engineer, the gyrauto is said to be capable of attaining a speed of 116 miles per hour and to operate at a much lower running cost than do more conventional cars. Seats, engine and all controls are suspended between two huge rubber-tired wheels which revolve as the car moves forward. There are accommodations for an extra passenger in addition to the driver.

The unusual piece of apparatus was demonstrated recently in Brussels, Belgium.
Fraquelli’s unique vehicle is similar in general design to the Dyno-Wheel motor bus featured on the cover of this issue of Modern Mechanix and Inventions and described on page 87.

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Hand Light Aids Night Driving (Oct, 1934)

The stylish alternative to blinkers.

Hand Light Aids Night Driving

The confusion over driving signals when motoring at night is largely eliminated with a new device which straps to the back of the hand.

A rubber half glove is fitted with a red reflector of Bohemian glass which makes hand signals easily visible at all ordinary distances.

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Neon Signs Identify Police Patrol Cars (Apr, 1939)

Neon Signs Identify Police Patrol Cars

Police cars assigned to the park districts of Chicago, Ill., are now fitted with roof-top neon signs so that motorists may identify them on the road at any time during the day or night. Within park areas, the police automobiles travel at legal speeds so that drivers may spot them and judge their own speed accordingly. Even in heavy fog, the rooftop signs are easily visible, as shown in the photograph reproduced
at the left.

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“Yield” Sign Reduces Accidents (Jan, 1952)

After years of research and development, scientists believe they have finally created a new type of street sign. Yes, it is truly a miracle of modern signage; a shining example of American know how and inventiveness.


“Yield” Sign Reduces Accidents

Warning motorists to give the right of way to cars on the intersecting road, a new “Yield” sign is already reducing accidents in Tulsa, Ok la., where it was developed. Designed for use in areas where traffic generally is not heavy enough to warrant full-stop requirements, the sign definitely places responsibility without requiring a complete stop. Motorists approaching the sign must slow down to at least 10 miles an hour and yield the right of way to any car approaching along the intersecting roadway. Any driver becoming involved in a collision at an intersection after passing a yield sign is automatically deemed to have violated the law.

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How I Got My Wife to Use a Seat Belt (Jun, 1960)

The title of this article should be: “How Mr. Pavlov got his wife to buckle up: a lesson for the auto-industry.”

How I Got My Wife to Use a Seat Belt

FOR 10 years I have used safety belts in my car. But each time we went for a ride I have had to tell my wife to fasten her belt. She is a most stubborn person and uses all kinds of excuses for not doing so.

I have finally won. These drawings show how. The system tells her to put the belt on. It works like magic every time. It saves arguments. The little reminder consists of a light, the words “Safety Belt,” a buzzer, and two cunningly wired snap switches.

When my wife gets into the front seat beside me, her weight trips a normally open snap switch under the seat. Two things happen: First a doorbell buzzer begins sounding behind the dash, attracting my wife’s attention toward it. Second, in the opening where a clock usually is mounted, the words “Safety Belt” are illuminated by a lamp behind the dash.

The second snap switch, normally closed, is mounted under one strap of the belt so that it is opened by the pressure of pulling the belt across the waist. This breaks the circuit, stopping the buzzer and turning off the lamp. As long as my wife sits in the seat, she’d better have the belt on correctly or the buzzer will let her know. [Editor's note: An optional cut-out switch is shown in the drawing for those who might like one.]

Now, when we start out, she races me to fasten the belt before I can use the ignition key and turn on the circuit. Seems she doesn’t like to hear the buzz. The only way to stop the buzz is to get out of the seat or turn off the ignition— or put on the belt. If she wants to go for a ride that leaves her little choice.

— Wes Jayne, Woodhaven, N.Y.

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