Archive
Transportation
Put An Outboard Motor On Your Bike (Feb, 1943)

… Or Put An Outboard Motor On Your Bike…
AN ATTACK on the trans– portation problem from a different angle has been made by G. E. Griffin, of Vass, N. C, at left. Mr. Griffin has attached a 3/4 h.p. aircooled outboard motor to his bicycle, the shaft geared by friction directly to the rear tire. He reports that the arrangement works very well, can do 30 m.p.h. or even better, and doesn’t appear to wear the rear tire badly at all.

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Soviet Engineers Building 80-foot “Glider” Boat (Nov, 1937)

Soviet Engineers Building 80-foot “Glider” Boat
SOVIET engineers are constructing a “glider” speedboat for service on the Black Sea. The boat will have two hulls and carry 150 people at a speed of over 40 m.p.h. Four aviation motors of 675 horsepower each will power the novel craft, which will be 80 feet long with a width of 40 feet. A model of the boat has been placed on public exhibition in Paris, France.

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“Rocket” Car Goes 40 M.P.H. (Oct, 1937)

“Rocket” Car Goes 40 M.P.H.
EQUIPPED with a one-cylinder motor that provides propulsion based on the theory of the fluid rocket, a novel midget car has been developed by Millet, famous Paris engineer. On its trial runs, the three-wheeler car is said to have attained speeds exceeding 40 m.p.h. The all-metal car is bullet-like in its appearance.

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Ad: I’D RATHER BE YOUR WIFE THAN YOUR WIDOW (Nov, 1937)

“I’D RATHER BE YOUR WIFE THAN YOUR WIDOW -
PLEASE PUT THIS BLOWOUT PROTECTION ON OUR CAR”

WHETHER you’re married or single — whether or not you’ve ever had a blow-out, don’t blind yourself to these facts:

Thousands of motorists are killed or injured—thousands of dollars are spent for repairs, doctor and hospital bills every year when blow-outs throw cars out of control. Every day somewhere, someone is headed for a cosdy or fatal blowout accident.

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Largest Private Plane is Flying Yacht (Jan, 1933)

Der plane! Der plane!

Largest Private Plane is Flying Yacht
• THE huge machine illustrated here appears to rival some of the air liners that have figured in trans-ocean flights. It is, however, the property of a wealthy British sportsman. Its cabins are luxuriously furnished as living quarters for protracted trips; the upholstered seats and berths folding to make living and sleeping quarters alternately commodious. Its size and power may be imagined from this view of its exterior.

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Pimp your IMP (Jun, 1953)

I love this picture.

MECHANIX ILLUSTRATED PIN-UP CAR
1913 IMP CYCLECAR
Owner: R. F. Clouse, Auburn, Ind. Engine: two-cylinder, air-cooled, 12 horsepower. Friction drive, four speeds forward. Sheet metal body over wood frame. Independent wheel suspension, no axles. Wheelbase 100 inches. Weight 600 pounds. Original price $375. Designed by William B. Stout.

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THE JET PLANES ARE HERE! (Dec, 1944)

My favorite quote: “The British jet plane, Gloucester, played an important part in turning back the robot attack on London.”
Damn those robots!

THE JET PLANES ARE HERE!

THE thrilling story of how the jet-propelled plane was developed in this country in almost complete secrecy was revealed recently. The beginnings go back to 1941.

In the fall of that year, the employees of the Statler Hotel in Boston were puzzled by the behavior of a mysterious English guest named Whitely. He ate his meals in his room, had a private telephone installed which did not go through the hotel switchboard, and asked that all his errands be handled by one bellboy. After a week, he left the hotel.

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LIGHT BEAMS Steer SUPER RACING CARS (Apr, 1936)

LIGHT BEAMS Steer SUPER RACING CARS
Speeds never before attained on land may become a reality if experiments with light beam, driverless cars are successful. Here are the mechanical features that will be involved.

WITH speeds, such as recently attained by the famous Sir Malcom Campbell, already approaching the point where human reflexes are too slow to insure safe control of the car, science has turned to the photo electric cell for a possible solution. A proposed driverless car involves the use of multiple electric eyes as the heart of its steering mechanism. A powerful beam of light directed at a large lens on the front of the car is concentrated on steel mirrors set at an angle in the trackbed. The reflections are “caught” by the electric eyes which convey the electrical impulses to a mechanical-electrical brain which keeps the speeding car on its course.

The use of the electric eye for this purpose is not surprising as German railway engineers have been operating trains on the Reichsbahnzentralamt of Munich in this manner for several years-Here a spotlight is mounted on the locomotive so that it throws a beam upward to a mirror on the block signal. When the signal is red the mirror reflects the beam to photo electric cells on the locomotive which automatically set the brakes. This method was described in the Modern Mechanix for November, 1934.

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The “Dynamic Control” Ocean Liner (Nov, 1934) (Nov, 1934)

The “Dynamic Control” Ocean Liner

By Hugo Gernsback

THE tendency at the present time in airplane building is toward constantly increasing size. It is probably realized by all who have concerned themselves with aircraft that the larger machines are not very far in the future. From the earliest Wright airplane, which weighed approximately 1/2 ton, to the present record holder, the DOX, which weighed fifty tons, took a period of some 26 years. The 10,000 ton airplane, projected on a like time-scale, would, therefore, make its appearance not later than the year 1952. However, with the nature of the present-day technique, it is quite possible, at this moment, that the 10,000 ton plane will be here much sooner.

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Uncle Sam’s School for Sailors (Feb, 1941)

Uncle Sam’s School for Sailors

WHEN you march through the main gate of the Naval Training Station at San Diego, Calif., as a raw recruit you leave the land behind. You will spend two months learning to be a sailor before you are assigned to the battle fleet but even though you are still on dry land, things are a lot like they are at sea.

In a couple of days you will know that a floor is really a deck and you’ll not make the mistake of calling a bulkhead a wall. You will ask whether the smoking lamp is lit instead of whether you may smoke and you will be telling time by ship’s bells instead of by hours.

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