Archive
Transportation
What’s it like to be a Boeing engineer? (Sep, 1952)

My favorite part is the caption: “Solving a dynamics problem with the Boeing Computer”. THE Boeing computer? What just the one? Do they all have to share?


What’s it like to be a Boeing engineer?

Boeing engineers enjoy many advantages — among them the finest re-search facilities in the industry. These include such advanced aids as the Boeing-designed, Boeing-built Electronic Analog Computer shown above.
This is part of the stimulating background that helps Boeing men maintain the leadership and prestige of an
Engineering Division that’s been growing steadily for 35 years.

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MARVEL Mystery Oil (Feb, 1952)

I’m not really sure what they’re trying to say in this ad… I think it’s either: “Marvel Oil will blow up your car”, or “Marvel oil is made of atomic bombs”.

FOR POWER
AND PERFORMANCE!
MARVEL Mystery Oil

More than 30 years of scientific research have gone into Marvel Mystery Oil, to meet the lubrication demands of today’s high – compression engines. Use in crankcase, gas tank, or top cylinder oiler… the ideal cure for hydraulic valve trouble.
See your dealer or write: EMEROL MANUFACTURING CO., INC.,
Depl 234, 242 West 69th St., New York 23. New York
BE ENGINE WISE…MARVELIZE NOW!

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Midget Jeep (Sep, 1949)

I love the name “Devil Junk” that he gave his jeep, though it does make it sound like the kid might have a heroin problem.

The midget jeep at the left was built by Valentin Labata. of Leyte. Philippine Islands. He starts his letter by asking, “I wonder if Filipinos are qualified to enter your Workbench Award contest?” They sure are, Val. We base our awards on ability, not nationality. He goes on to say. “A 3-hp. Wisconsin engine drives one rear wheel through a belt, giving 25 m.p.h, top speed and 75 to 80 miles per gallon. The brake works through the other rear wheel. I received help from my father, who donated the engine and the wheels, and two relatives. That’s me in the middle. The other two boys are the helpful relatives.”

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Build Your Own Street Legal Kart (May, 1962)

Well, it was apparently street legal in 1962 at least.

In case you had any concerns about reliability; read about these guys driving this kart around the world.

MI’s HIGHWAY KART

You don’t need a trailer or a station wagon to haul this kart to a track you can drive it there on public roads!

By R. J. Capotosto

DRIVING a kart is a real thrill. Seated on a low-slung frame only inches from the ground, you feel as if you’re doing 80 mph when you’re doing 20. Yet it’s surprisingly safe. The low center of gravity and a width two-thirds the length make it almost impossible to flip a kart in a tight turn. Just about everyone who tries a kart gets the urge to own one—and if you’ve got that urge, you get a bonus in building the MI Highway Kart.

Since karts are generally driven on special tracks, it is not necessary to register them. However, transporting a kart is often a problem. It can be hauled in a station wagon—if you own a wagon—or it can be towed on a trailer. Either way, the lugging can be quite a nuisance. With this in mind, our model was designed so that registration could be obtained, making it possible to drive the kart to its destination on public roads.

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Makes Coffee as You Drive (Sep, 1953)

Makes Coffee as You Drive
The young lady is enjoying a cup of coffee made by a German gadget that clamps onto the dash and plugs into the car’s electric system. Hot water filters through powdered coffee into a cup. Cimo Sievers, NYC, distributes Paluxette.

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AROUND THE WORLD BY KART! (May, 1962)

AROUND THE WORLD BY KART!

“They said we were crazy to try — but we’ve already traveled 10,000 miles!”

By William Glen Davis

DRIVE a kart around the world?

Man, you’re nuts! You’ll never make it!”

This was the almost universal reaction that greeted my announced intention to circle the globe on a four-wheeled beetle smaller than many a baby carriage. Now, 10,000 miles later, I like to think the scoffers have been silenced.

My plan was first to drive from Los Angeles to Mexico City and back in order to test the feasibility of a ’round-the-world trip by kart. Then I would head for New York and from there take a boat to Europe. Once in Europe I would work out the details of my itinerary.

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Jet-Age Custom Car (Sep, 1954)

What this really reminds me of is the car from The Ambiguously Gay Duo

Jet-Age Custom Car
No flames spout from the tail pipes of a custom-built three-wheeled car, but that is about the only difference between it and a space ship! The engine is a 60-horsepower V8 mounted in the rear. A single front wheel is suspended on a motorcycle fork. The sheet-metal body is welded to the frame. Air scoops on each side of the body ventilate the engine. The 10 tail pipes permit the hot air from the engine to escape. The unusual car was built by Stanley M. Eakin of Grove City, Ohio. It took six years of his spare time. Top speed is about 90 miles per hour.

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Early Porsche (Sep, 1953)

Looks like it would be a lot of fun to try getting into that.

New German Sports Car Called 125-Mile-an-Hour Speedster
A recent entry in the sports-car field is this Porsche racer from Germany—a more powerful and faster machine than the model previously offered by the same maker. Power has been boosted from 70 to 80 horsepower and maximum speed, it is reported, from about 110 to 125 miles an hour. Body design has been revamped, too, with the result that the new model has a body a few inches lower than its predecessor.

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Lucky Kid’s Midget Tractor (Sep, 1949)

Lucky kid, I want a tractor too!

Our next award goes to a proud wife and mother, Mrs. S. C. Manila, of Boyceville. Wisconsin. Her letter reads, “I cannot help but forward the enclosed, snapshot of a tractor my husband made for our youngsters. It really has created envy in everyone who sees it. It stops traffic and all children just must touch it and ride in it. I am sure your readers will be interested. It is powered with a 2/3-hp. engine and will pull four coaster wagons carrying 12 children. Our boy in the snapshot is just four years old.”

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SECRET WEAPONS (Apr, 1944)

This article is supposedly about German secret weapons, but really is a propaganda piece expounding on the superiority of American arms and engineering. My favorite quote is: “So far the Germans haven’t come through with anything approaching the new British-American jet-driven plane, which is already in production.”

As far as I know the Germans already had Me-262‘s in the field at this point. The the only American jet to be deployed in the war was the P-80 and by the end of hostilities in Europe, a grand total of 4 had made it to Europe.

SECRET WEAPONS

by Major Malcolm Wheeler-Nicholson

“Our new weapons,” says Admiral W. H. P. Blandy, “can be and are kept secret, except that the enemy receives hill knowledge of their effects.” Here, in a sober analysis. Mi’s military analyst debunks the Herrenvolk’s “secret weapon” scare.

OUT of the rumor factories of Stockholm, Bern, and Berlin come periodic threats of miracle-working Nazi “secret weapons” that will blast the Allies sky high and clinch the war overnight. Are they sheer bluff?

As this is being written, a hullabaloo is still raging in the press over the much-touted German “rocket bomb.” Dr. Goebbels himself, fanning the propaganda flames, has claimed that a whole British convoy was wiped out in the English Channel in a matter of minutes by murderous long-range rocket shells. He would have us believe that the entire North French coast is a solid mass of rocket batteries capable of lobbing 12-ton bombs over London, each one powerful enough to devastate 20 square miles.

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