FRONTIER CABIN (Jan, 1960)

FRONTIER CABIN

$1.00 – 5 for $4.00 BIG ENOUGH FOR 2-3 KIDS!

This huge, western-style cabin is a child’s dream come true.

Size Approx. 3 ft. high—9 ft. square, 23cubic ft. inside. Endless hours of play run. Big: enough for 2-3 kids to ‘Live’ in this cabin of their very own. Constructed of specially treated, safe… flameproof and waterproof DuPont Polyethelene. Use year round, indoors or outdoors. No tools needed, nothing to assemble. Sets up in a jiffy, folds compactly for easy storage. Walls and door are realistically imprinted in authentic brown split-log design. Peaked roof is in contrasting color. In a youngster’s imagination it quickly becomes a RANCH HOUSE… FARMHOUSE… PLAY-HOUSE or A LIFE-SIZE DOLL HOUSE FOR GIRLS. A Bunkhouse — Jail house —Sheriff’s Office—Secret Clubhouse for Boys. This King-size cabin is our greatest bargain in years. A comparable $3.98 value now only $1.00. This sale price is made possible by your buying directly from factory. We are the largest mfrs. and Distrs. of playhouses in the U.S. Over 260,000 satisfied customers. They make wonderful gifts. Buy several. Add 25c each house, postage and handling charges. Sorry, no C.O.D.’s. Special Offer: 5 for $4.00. GUARANTEE: Try without risk or obligation for ten days. Let the kids play in and enjoy it. If they are not delighted return for immediate refund.

Special…
GIRL’S PLAYHOUSE NOW AVAILABLE!

Same size, shape and price as cabin. Imprinted brick wails, French windows, folded wood-slat shutters, flowers, shrubs, sloping roof, large door. etc.

Orders Shipped Within 24 Hours!

NOVEL Mfg. Co. Dept 601, 125 E. 46 Street, New York 17, N. Y.

7 comments
  1. George says: December 5, 20118:35 am

    I think “9 feet square” means “9 square feet.” I think my cousin had one of those and it was printed fabric/plastic that slipped over a card table.

  2. GaryM says: December 5, 20119:01 am

    I remember seeing the original of that ad. If it’s 9 square feet and 3 feet high, the “2-3 kids” in it would have been very cozy.

  3. Mike Brown says: December 5, 20119:28 am

    I think that picture goes rather over the line of misleading – 9 square feet means it’s basically 3′x3′ square, with the peak 3′ high. Passing on the strange three-dimensionality of the printed plastic walls, the dimensions of the drawing are all wrong, and that kid had to be really out of scale.

    Typical for the ads in the back of magazines at the time, though.

  4. Charlie says: December 5, 201110:50 am

    Mike: This is still a pretty common problem: http://consumerist.com/…

  5. Hirudinea says: December 5, 201111:12 am

    Polyethelene Frontier Cabin, just like the pioneers had.

  6. Alex says: December 5, 20115:52 pm

    @Charlie Good one! Banzai has had some cool and unique stuff that I simply had to have for my odd hobby of collecting inflatable pool toys and out of the two pools and 5 or 6 rafts I have every single one is way smaller than the box showed. Too bad my dad was born in 60 as this seems like his kind of thing though.

  7. Charlene says: December 6, 20116:37 am

    The worst for this are architectural illustrations, where proposed buildings are drawn completely out of proportion to the finished building. A house on a lot 30 feet wide will be shown with four or five sedans parked in front of it, or a commercial building will be depicted as twice as high and wide as it’s intended to be. And of course, all proposed buildings come with a row of full-size mature trees in front, even those on busy streets with no space for even a windowbox.

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