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Nov, 1933
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Feb, 1934
Seedless Tomato Grown in Texas
Seedless Tomato Grown in Texas AFTER long experiment, a seedless tomato lias been developed by an Amarillo, Texas, llorist. The flavor of the tomato is improved with the disappearance of the seeds, it is said. The seedless tomato was developed after years of taking cuttings from plants producing tomatoes with the fewest seeds. New plants […]
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Enter this Workshop Contest! $150 IN CASH PRIZES
ALL aboard! There is still time for you to get your entry in on the novel contest announced in last month's Modern Mechanix and Inventions! For the benefit of those who missed the first announcement we repeat: We are looking for the most practical and at the same time the most novel cigarette holder we can get so that plans can be run in the magazine.
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Balbo Plans Daring Non-Stop World Flight
Balbo Plans Daring Non-Stop World Flight THE first actual world flight of 25,000 miles in two days without a landing is said to be under consideration by Gen. Italo Balbo. Four seaplanes, designed for flying eight miles above the earth, would accomplish the feat by refueling in four dirigibles, spaced at 6,250-mile intervals. One dirigible […]
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DREAD Sleeping Sickness Baffles Science
AN ENEMY so tiny that it cannot be detected by the most powerful microscope is giving medical science one of the greatest battles of its historic career. And thus far science can not claim the victory. The enemy is the mysterious transmission agency responsible for the spread of the strange malady of sleeping sickness or "encephalitis" because it attacks the "encephalon," or brain. The epidemic in St. Louis, Mo., and its suburbs is the largest outbreak the country has ever known.
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Whistling Beacons Mark Airfield for Blind Landings
HIGH pitched whistles to designate boundaries of an airport make it possible for a pilot to make a blind landing, recent experiments have shown. The newly designed whistles, called sonic marker beacons, send out fan shaped beams of sound by means of which the aviator can determine definitely the length of the airfield.
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Bullet-proof Shield Protects Police Officers in Gun Battles
COLLAPSIBLE armored shields to protect the bodies of police in gun battles have been invented to aid Uncle Sam in his war on crime. The shields were designed following the slaying of four officers in front of the Union station in Kansas City, Missouri. The collapsible armor permits free movement of the body. The shield is made in three sections, the two end sections hinging to the center body piece. At the top is an opening fitted with bullet-proof glass through which the officer can see ahead.
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Tall Periscope Aids Golfers
Tall Periscope Aids Golfers A NOVEL “skyscraper” periscope shows golfers the blind fairway at the third hole at the Aberoovey golf course in Wales. The unusual periscope is 30 feet tall. At the third hole of the course the fairway rises so abruptly from the driving tee that golfers can not see the green even […]
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WORLD'S LARGEST STATUE CARVED IN MOUNTAIN
THE world regards with awe the stupendous sculptural achievements of the ancient engineers who built the Egyptian Sphinx, the Colossus of Rhodes and the Pyramids, but now it has a new monumental edifice to marvel at which dwarfs the projects of the ancients to almost insignificant proportio
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Be a Character Actor
Here's the Makeup Successful character acting depends on skillful use of grease paint and a study of the character to be portrayed. On the left the actor is making up to take the part of a negro comedian. On the right the completed happy-go-lucky, ever smiling "negro" is ready for the stage.
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Glass FURNITURE One of New Household Appliances
Electricity is harnessed to operate this can opener. Place the can on the revolving platform and the lid comes off neatly in two seconds. New mechanical tea brewing pot now on the market manufactures the beverage uniformly brewed and free from impurities. An automatic "time flip" is a feature. This has a timing vent which allows hot water to escape into the pot in three, four or five minutes, as desired. When time cup is empty an air float lifts the tea cylinder up out of the water, completing the steeping.
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Moving Shelves Pass Customers in New Self-service Store
CUSTOMERS sit at ease as shelves move past them in a new self-service market opened in Los Angeles. The shelves are attached to an endless chain. The customers sit on stools before a counter and pick the groceries they want as the shelves move by. The moving shelf is 157 feet long and makes a complete revolution every eight minutes.
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Behind the Scenes With Movie Sound Fakers
The baying of wolves, the clackety-clack of horses' hoofs, the creaking of auto brakes—these sounds which you hear from the silver screen seldom come from their real sources. This story by an eminent movie sound expert takes you behind the scenes and shows you how these noises are faked. by MURRAY SPIVAK Famous Hollywood Sound Director ONE afternoon recently I sat in the scoring room of the movie studio where I am sound director watching a team of horses gallop down a country road. Later in the picture trees swayed in a violent wind, and then brush broke as an actor ran through a forest. But never a sound issued from the talking screen.
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Vision Perpetual Motion In This Rubber Band Engine
AN ENGINE run only by a single rubber band—does it have possibilities of perpetual motion? Many who saw it on exhibit at the Hall of Science in Chicago's Century of Progress Exposition believe it has. The engine, shown on the left, obtains its energy from heat directed on the rubber band. Many persons visioned the probability of substituting solar heat for the electrical heaters used in the exhibit. However, perpetual motion is an impossibility as the machine would run only during life of band.
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Radio-cooked Toast Never Tastes Burned, Even If Black
Radio-cooked Toast Never Tastes Burned, Even If Black RADIO cooking is the latest stunt developed by broadcast engineers. If a hot lunch is wanted by the operators in a transmitting station, all they have to do is place their food between the electrodes of the transmitter. In a few moments it will be done to […]
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MECHANICAL NEWS of the Month
Pictured here are the latest news shots of developments in the world of science, engineering and plain home mechanics. Each thirty days sees a galaxy of new ideas which our alert cameramen catch for your enlightenment, instruction and amusement. This "Hammer of the Future" is a balanced head which is screwed on to prevent its flying off the handle. But who'd want to fly off the handle with pretty Greta Christenson near?
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Strategy of New U.S. Aerial Patrol Traps "Sky Smugglers"
by RALPH SPENCER Customs Bureau Men, perplexed by the flood of narcotics, precious stones and undesirable aliens pouring across our borders, have now traced the contraband goods to their sources—"sky smugglers." How Uncle Sam's new aerial border patrolmen hunt down these outlaws with ingenious aerial strategy is told in this story of gripping aeronautical adventure. FIVE thousand feet above the arid Texas-Mexican border an airplane speeds on a secret, illicit mission. Traveling well over 150 miles per hour the craft maintains its speed until about three miles west of Poteet, Texas.
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Pilot Your Own Plane and Never Crash!
NOVICES can pilot airplanes without any training on a new amusement park device. The untrained pilot can dive, climb, and hank at will. He is limited, however, to a small circular course by the arms of the machine which holds several planes. The airplanes are standard ships and are controlled by regulation "joy sticks." Each plane is run by its own three horsepower motor.
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Microscope Magnifies 20,000 Times
Microscope Magnifies 20,000 Times A NEW universal microscope that has a magnification of 20,000 is expected to bring greater success in man’s battle against disease germs. With present microscopes only germs that have reached maturity could be seen. With the new powerful 21 phase microscope it will be possible to study and photograph germs in […]
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Young MISTER CORD ~ TITAN of Transportation
From a battered flivver E. L. Cord has built an empire of automobiles, airplanes, ships and railroads. Here is the story of the amazing career of this young mechanic who became a financial genius. A youth of 20 proudly drove a battered flivver out of a dealer's yard in Los Angeles. The engine wheezed and died. The youth spun the crank futilely. Then he pushed the car to an incline, and it rolled downward just as he got a precarious footing on the running board. He tumbled into the seat and grabbed the wheel. The motor awoke and the car chugged on. Three weeks later the youth appeared in the yard—behind the wheel of a glisteningly maroon "speedster."
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FREAK Musical STUNTS Make Fun and PROFITS
FOR parties, picnics, and all such gatherings where entertainment is the outstanding feature, there's nothing that furnishes quite so much amusement as a freak musical rendition. And if you're the person who can keep the crowd amused you'll be the hero of the day. A number of simple tricks in music which you can master with a little practice have been devised by Dr. C. C. Wiedemann, a prof at the University of Nebraska. Not only can you liven up a party with these stunts, but, if you're good enough, you can earn a few extra shekels to help balance the family budget.
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DARING DEATH With NEWS CAMERAMEN
by TED DALTON Picture Assignment Editor, the New York News. Why wasn't De Pinedo rescued? Why couldn't mechanics save him if photo sleuths got close enough to take tragic shots—? Why do news cameramen dare death, go to any length to get pictures of executions, burning munitions factories, gang wars—? Ted Dalton, camera ace, gives the answers in this thrilling yarn about Unsung Knights of the Shutter! THE universal clamor today is for pictures —for action photographs of thrilling drama, of death-defying adventures, and of disasters in every quarter of the globe.
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Jap Clockspring Car Runs 40 mi a Winding
Jap Clockspring Car Runs 40 mi a Winding THE Japanese have never gained any notable degree of fame for their mechanical capabilities, but undoubtedly their reputations along this line will get vigorous boost by their invention of an automobile that runs by clockwork. Very little mechanical data is available on the construction of the new […]
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Camera Sculptures FACES from Subjects
The machine has at last invaded the world of art. An amazing new mechanism recently devised combines the principles of the movie camera and the pantograph to turn out plaster busts just as an ordinary camera makes photographic portraits. Making the bust requires a sitting of only five minutes on the part of the subject. During this time 400 still photographs are made from as many angles by a rotating camera, as illustrated above.
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Periscope for Bridge Kabitzers
Periscope for Bridge Kabitzers AT A recent international bridge match the problem of letting people watch the play without interfering with the players was satisfactorily solved by the use of a horizontal periscope with one end suspended over the table and the other fitted through one wall of the room, so that the observers need […]
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Walking Sponge Shocks Science
Walking Sponge Shocks Science SPONGES creeping from place to place seeking food appeared mysteriously in the London Aquarium. Scientists ridiculed reports of the keepers, since sponges have been known only to permanently fasten themselves to the sea’s bottom. However, Maurice Burton, British Museum expert, proved the keepers were correct.
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Galaxy of Huge Bridges for San Francisco - Oakland
CALIFORNIA'S native sons boast of many tilings, such as invigorating climate, variegated scenery, soil fertility, and now they are to have another item added to their list—a bridge with the world's largest suspension span. This will be the Golden Gate suspension bridge, now under construction, anil but part of a galaxy of huge bridges which will facilitate the movement of vehicular traffic in the western seaports.
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Golf Club Cart Abolishes Caddy
Golf Club Cart Abolishes Caddy A NEW golf club cart now on the market may relegate the caddy to oblivion, along with the telegrapher, the movie theatre musician and the horse. The cart is built along the lines of the truck commonly employed in wheeling boxed goods. The golf bag straps to the handle, its […]
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Electric Spikes Roast Weinies
Electric Spikes Roast Weinies MANY weinie roasts planned in advance are dismal failures because when that day arrives it is pouring rain and the usual procedure is to call off the party. No need for that if you’ll utilize the little stunt below. You can hold your roast indoors. All you need is two boards, […]
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MODIFIED STOCK CAR RACING - America's New Sport of Thrills
Modified stock car racing is taking the country by storm, and offering young speed demons a chance to win handsome prizes. Here an old head at the game tells you how you can strip down your car and qualify for these spectacular events. by ROBERT M. ROOF MODIFIED stock car races are now being featured on almost every dirt track race in the country. These spectacular events are winning a fast-growing popularity, attracting thousands and thousands of people on the look-out for some new thrill. As this sport increases in popularity, the chances for steel-nerved drivers to win huge purses also become more numerous. State and county fairs most always stage a stock car race—and it is here that budding young speed demons get a chance to break into the racing game.
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Urge Alcohol Gas for Farm Relief
FOR economic and technical reasons a mixture of alcohol and gasoline for automobile fuel is being recommended by farm relief advocates. Use of the fuel by motorists would consume 680,000,000 bushels of corn a year, greatly reducing the crop surplus, it is said. The gasoline would be diluted with 10 per cent of alcohol. It is claimed the fuel results in greater power at considerably less cost.
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