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Jun, 1930
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Aug, 1930
It keeps faith with your needs
An Advertisement of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company You have found a constantly growing use for the telephone. You have learned its value in business. You have found it helpful in keeping contact with family and friends. Its increasing use has given the telephone its humanly important place in modern life and requires the expenditure of hundreds of millions annually for extensions and improvements.
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WOMAN BREATHES ONLY THREE TIMES A MINUTE
A woman who breathes only three to five times per minute has been discovered by Dr. Francis G. Benedict, of Boston. Her breathing rate is approximately one sixth that of the normal individual, who inhales and exhales about eighteen times a minute.
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Miscellaneous Cool Stuff
SHOT FIRED AGAINST STEEL TO CLEAN IT A scene suggesting a fantastic stage setting is enacted daily in a remote room of the General Electric Company's plant at Schenectady, N.Y. There, under the glare of powerful lights, gnomelike workmen scour large steel castings to prepare them for a coat of paint. Hoses in their hands discharge a continuous, clattering volley of fine steel shot upon the part being cleaned. In this dusty atmosphere, the men must wear headgear like divers' helmets, with fresh washed air supplied to them continuously through tubes from outside the room.
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Jumping from the Sky
Diving out of an airplane is nothing to Buddy Bushmeyer, who is now regarded as the Greatest Dare-Devil of the Air. By BUDDY BUSHMEYER FOR seven years, I have been leaping into thin air and trusting to parachutes. I have landed in watermelon patches in Missouri, missed boulders on Colorado mountain sides, come whirling down at fifty miles an hour in a parachute spin. I have barely avoided high tension wires and once I came within what seemed an inch of dropping helpless out of the sky in front of a speeding train.
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HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT
For persons suffering with tuberculosis, or just from nerves, will physicians soon prescribe a trip to the clouds in a flying clinic instead of a visit to the mountains? Not long ago Charles L. Julliot, French lawyer, proposed that airplanes or dirigibles transport such patients above the clouds. His suggestion, which America hears was approved by the medical faculties of France, called attention to the fact that high altitude and sunshine produce well-known changes in the blood, in many cases beneficial.
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Strange Friendships Among Animals
When the lion lies down with the lamb—or maybe this cat and mouse really are on friendly terms and Pussy has no idea of following her natural bent. It's a fact that surprising intimacies do spring up between animals born to be enemies and of course this may be a case of that kind. Still the mouse better watch his step and take no chances.
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Inventions to Lighten Your Household Chores
When this electric cooker is placed face downward over a plate of meat, radiant heat cooks it through in ten minutes. In this way, meals can be prepared at the table. Silk stockings and other fragile clothing not meant for the regular wash go into a separate compartment in this metal hamper. Soiled clothes are all put in at the top but only the heavy articles come out at the bottom.
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Not one out of ten escapes this social fault
Can you be sure that you never have halitosis (unpleasant breath)? Are you certain at this very moment, that you are free of it? The insidious thing about this unforgivable social fault is that you, yourself, never know when you have it; the victim simply cannot detect it. Remember, also, that anyone is likely to be troubled, since conditions capable of causing halitosis arise frequently in even normal mouths.
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Crooks Cured by Surgeons Knife
Here for the first time is the amazing story of how criminals in San Quentin prison, California, are made honest by giving them healthy glands. By H. H. DUNN THE surgeon's knife and the laboratory test tube have entered the campaign against crime. Experimental researches, carried on over a number of years and beginning to show results in control and reform institutions this summer, indicate that criminal tendencies may be eradicated, development of the criminal averted, and the established criminal restored to normal by medical and surgical treatment.
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Air Photos Made by Army Pigeons
TINY aerial photos, snapped by a little camera attached to a carrier pigeon, are being made in Germany, where these birds are trained for military purposes. One of the small cameras, fastened to a pigeon's body, can take six automatic snapshots while the bird is in flight.
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Mechanical Aids for Play or Work
TEACHES YOU TO DANCE—A Berlin dancing master invented this checkerboard affair to make it easy to learn dancing steps. It is a floorboard, designed to fit the average size room. On it are numbered squares. A code tells upon what square the feet should be for each step. A TINY PROJECTOR—This movie projection machine, invented in Germany, is less than four inches long—small enough to fit in a coat pocket. A special size film is used. The battery is so powerful that 200 shows can be given without changing it. The image that is thrown on a screen or wall by the tiny device is about the size of a picture frame.
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MACHINE MIMICS GLOW OF FIREPLACE
Electric light is transformed into a screen-play of moving color forms for entertainment in the living room by the home "Clavilux," a form of the symphonic light organ intended for the theateror auditorium (P. S. M., Feb. '29, p. 37). The new instrument, adapted to the home, is designed as a dual cabinet in the modernistic style, the upper section containing a screen upon which color symphonies are played from a projection apparatus in the cabinet below.
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HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT
For persons suffering with tuberculosis, or just from nerves, will physicians soon prescribe a trip to the clouds in a flying clinic instead of a visit to the mountains? Not long ago Charles L. Julliot, French lawyer, proposed that airplanes or dirigibles transport such patients above the clouds. His suggestion, which America hears was approved by the medical faculties of France, called attention to the fact that high altitude and sunshine produce well-known changes in the blood, in many cases beneficial. Add to this the natural exhilaration of an air trip, he says, and the effect might be even better than that of a mountain vacation (P. S. M., Mar. '30, p. 34).
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