PUSHBUTTON BEACH CLIMBER (Jul, 1956)

|<<
<< Previous
1 of 2
|<<
<< Previous
1 of 2

PUSHBUTTON BEACH CLIMBER

These Long Islanders live only 200 feet from the beach—by their own funicular railroad.

SLIDING down and climbing up a 200-foot, 45-degree sand bluff is fun for the kiddies but poor sport for the whole family—especially if it’s required activity. Anyway, that’s the way engineer Zvi Gezari felt about the only approach to the Long Island Sound beach near his home. The climb back up was out of keeping with his ideas of summer luxury—especially when he was loaded down with the paraphernalia of sun-and-salt bathing. So he organized his Rocky Point neighbors into a legal body called the High Cliff Beach Corporation; initiation fee: $200, annual dues: $10. With the proceeds he bought some steel rail, an old railroad handcar, some machinery and cable and transformed it all into a small cable car railroad. The lift is a self-service device; you get your group aboard, turn your key in the lock at the bottom, press a button and up you go! Just time for a chorus of funiculi, funicula before the top.

3 comments
  1. docespresso says: September 13, 201210:42 am

    I like that the safety device is a hook that just grabs a tie. I have my doubts about that working very well if at all.

  2. AZTiger says: April 8, 20202:32 pm

    I lived in Boston and visited my grandma at Rocky Point from 1966 until we moved to California in 1976. For those 10 years (which were 10 years after this article first published, so it operated for at least 20 years), me and my sisters and cousins would go to the beach in the summer every day we visited using “the Lift” as we called it. It was painted a yellowish color and my sisters wouldn’t let me work the key, because if you turned the key and pushed the button and didn’t get the key back out (the basket started down immediately) then someone would have to climb back up the slope to retrieve the key left at the top. I was too little to be trusted to get it right, ha ha. It never broke, stopped, or had any issues. I love that memory so much and now 45 years later I got teary seeing this fabulous picture pop out of memory. I’ve sent it to all my family, as Granny is long gone and we never moved back East again. I’m sure it’s no longer there, but THANK YOU for publishing this and warming my heart with this fond memory.

  3. AZTiger says: April 9, 20203:11 am

    Oh, and that guy who built it – Zvi Gezari? Yeah he was an industrial engineer and was friends with Albert Einstein: http://www.defyingthena…. So yeah, it worked.

Submit comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.