Archive
Tag "advertising"
Delivery Cars That Advertise (Feb, 1930)

Delivery Cars That Advertise

SOME unique delivery trucks and wagons are used by Los Angeles merchants, and one of the most odd is the car shown below.

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Bet You Don’t Know This About Advertising (Nov, 1950)

Bet You Don’t Know This About Advertising

By Susan

Quiz No. 1
What does it cost to advertise a pack of a leading brand of cigarettes? Is it 2c a pack? 3c? 5c?

Answer: It costs less than 1/2c a pack to advertise the big brands of cigarettes. That’s only half the story. Advertising lowers your cost two ways:
Cuts the selling costs. And by helping make mass production possible, lowers the production costs, too.

So advertising saves you many times that 1/2c per pack.

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AN ELECTRIC KALEIDOSCOPE (Feb, 1909)

AN ELECTRIC KALEIDOSCOPE

By MERRILL M. HUNTING

HE thrills of pleasure that came to us in our childhood, as we gazed at the ever changing beauties of the kaleidoscope are vividly recalled to our memory by a recent achievement in electric sign construction.

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Million – Dollar “Spectacular” World’s Biggest Advertisement (Aug, 1936)

Million – Dollar “Spectacular” World’s Biggest Advertisement

TIMES SQUARE, where the Gay White Way bursts into volcanic illumination, has seen many electric moving signs — “spectaculars” they call them—since these were invented. A quarter-century ago, the Chariot Race (from Ben Hur) blazed down on the square. Its latest record-breaking acquisition is pitched at a slower-moving, good-natured tempo, in accordance with the mood of its “prospects.”

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“This campaign strategy makes sense.” – “Because TV Guide matches our markets best” (Oct, 1961)

“This campaign strategy makes sense.”

“Because TV Guide matches our markets best”

Successful campaigns depend upon how well your advertising investment parallels your market profile. TV Guide can offer you profitable selling advantages with both unique regional flexibility and creative uses of its pages. For America’s best-selling weekly magazine is also America’s most efficient and versatile marketing tool. Here are four diverse examples:

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CLEVER EXHIBITS SEEN AT SAN FRANCISCO (Sep, 1915)

These are from the Panama–Pacific International Exposition of 1915. I love that it had a building called “The Palace of Varied Industries

CLEVER EXHIBITS SEEN AT SAN FRANCISCO

Advertising Apples
The huge model contains a reproduction of the famous valley.

Night Lights of an Aeroplane
The plate was left open and recorded the path followed by Art Smith as he “looped the loop”. The streaks were made when he turned on the light at intervals while climbing.

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SPEEDOMETER ON BACK OF CAR IS GARAGE AD (Oct, 1933)

SPEEDOMETER ON BACK OF CAR IS GARAGE AD

Installing a monster speedometer in the back of a car, as illustrated above, so that its reading will be plainly visible from the rear, is the latest way of advertising garage service. A legend on the dial reads, “How’s your speedometer?”, inviting the driver of a following car to keep pace while he compares his own instrument with the speed-indicating pointer.

Carefully calibrated for accuracy, it permits a quick and satisfactory check-up.

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WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH ONE INCH? (Nov, 1933)

WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH ONE INCH?

This is written in one inch — the smallest advertisement accepted in this magazine. Small advertisements of one or two inches produce results of many times their cost for hundreds of companies or individuals who have novelties, scientific or mechanical equipment, tools, games, puzzles, etc., to sell, and for firms looking for agents.

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Worn Auto Parts Skeleton Shows Need For Lubrication (Nov, 1938)

Worn Auto Parts Skeleton Shows Need For Lubrication
WORN parts from a discarded automobile mounted on a board to represent a skeleton as a lesson in the need for correct lubrication for automobiles) reminds patrons in a Green Bay, Wisconsin, gas station not to overlook the value of oil and grease in their cars.

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SEX in Advertising (Mar, 1964)

SEX in Advertising

How Madison Avenue manipulates erotic images in order to sell more merchandise.

by Richard Stiller, M.A.

Mr. Stiller is Associate Editor of this publication.

There was a time when Madison Avenue avoided the downright sexy and suggestive and settled for a pretty face. And in the advertisements for female undergarments even the pretty face was taboo.

But no more! Today “sex is the sizzle that sells” everything from sweat socks to hotel rooms. And it sells them in erotic images that rival the sexiness of the modern film, novel, and play.

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